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 Post subject: Zenith "Long Distance" 6G001 question/help
PostPosted: Mar Tue 22, 2016 8:00 pm 
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Joined: Jul Thu 30, 2009 5:38 pm
Posts: 122
Location: Church Hill, Tennessee
I have just acquired a 1946/1947 Zenith "Long Distance" radio with a model number on a paper label inside the radio. The model reads 6G001YXZ1. It also says it's a 6C40Z1 chassis. I purchased a schematic based on this info. When I pulled the tubes out to test them I noticed that instead of having what the schematic said should be a 117Z6 rectifier, mine had a small 117Z3 tube in a much smaller tube socket. This socket had not been replaced as it was factory riveted in. I did some on line research and found some of this variation talked about on certain models that proved some were made like this. I then ordered a manual & schematic from Steve Johnson specifically for a 6C40 chassis. Nothing in this one either about a 117Z3 tube. The problem I'm having is some of the original untouched Zenith caps and resistors are different also. I have replaced the caps exactly with what values were in there, but the resistor colors are faded with a few that are totally unidentifiable. Are there some Zenith experts out there that can help me out with a correct schematic with this tube variation? Thank you.

SteveG


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 Post subject: Re: Zenith "Long Distance" 6G001 question/help
PostPosted: Mar Tue 22, 2016 9:20 pm 
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Joined: Apr Sat 22, 2006 10:46 pm
Posts: 1564
Location: Waterloo, Iowa
The smaller rectifier is prone to shorts, be sure to test carefully, or better replace, they are cheap. Problem is those radios were usually run hard until the power supply failed and roasts the rectifier. Replace the power supply electrolytics and paper foil caps, and it will likely work fine.


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 Post subject: Re: Zenith "Long Distance" 6G001 question/help
PostPosted: Mar Wed 23, 2016 12:04 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 2821
Location: Northport wa. USA.
The Z-1 in the chassis model denotes the change. The owners manual may have not changed, but the service info will. Sounds like you may have just asked for the service info for the set without the Z-1 designation. I think the Zenith manual has both types shown.


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 Post subject: Re: Zenith "Long Distance" 6G001 question/help
PostPosted: Mar Wed 23, 2016 12:21 am 
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Joined: Jul Thu 30, 2009 5:38 pm
Posts: 122
Location: Church Hill, Tennessee
Thank you Ted and Jim. Jim, after receiving the schematic from Steve Johnson I contacted him and told him the whole story. He went through all his factory service manuals and didn't even find a chassis 6C40Z1 listed in Zenith's factory service index. He said they may have issued a supplement, but he has never seen one.

Anyone else out there that may have dealt with this issue before?


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 Post subject: Re: Zenith "Long Distance" 6G001 question/help
PostPosted: Dec Sat 09, 2017 8:54 pm 
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Joined: Mar Sat 12, 2016 4:41 pm
Posts: 9
Location: Gulfport, MS
6G001YXZ1. 6C40Z1 chassis

I trying to fix one of these. Zenith substituted to the 117z3 rectifier at some point. I have not seen a schematic with the correction.


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 Post subject: Re: Zenith "Long Distance" 6G001 question/help
PostPosted: Dec Sun 10, 2017 6:18 am 
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Location: Oxford, MI
The rectifier changes occurred during the postwar period from 1946-1949 or so in portable radios.

The first rectifier tube for portables was the 117Z6/G/GT which began being used before the war. It had a 117V nominal filament meaning it could be operated directly off the line because the other tubes in the set cannot be run off of AC. It was a double diode rectifier but always wired with the plates strapped together as a half wave rectifier. It had a 75mA filament.

The 117Z3 was introduced in 1945. It was a 7 pin miniature tube which used less space than the octal 117Z6/G/GT. It was a purpose built half wave rectifier with a 40mA filament which meant less heat buildup in the cabinet.

The selenium rectifier eliminated the heater requirement entirely which meant that portables could be made smaller and less heat resistant (IE plastic.) and consumed less current when operated off the line. This technology hadn't quite been worked out in the late 40's so some manufacturers switched back and forth between tube and selenium rectifiers on otherwise similar radios, such as the RCA 66BX and 8BX6.

The Zenith 6G001Y used all of these rectifiers during its production run. The 6G001Y used the 117Z6/G/GT, the 6G00YZ1 used the 117Z3 and the 6G001YZ2 used the selenium rectifier. The circuit was otherwise the same. There was also variants in the cabinet being wood or aluminum.

_________________
Caretaker of Portable Tube Radios


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