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PostPosted: Jan Thu 17, 2008 1:47 am 
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Location: powell wyoming
http://i268.photobucket.com/albums/jj22 ... CT0126.jpg

lets try this


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PostPosted: Jan Thu 17, 2008 4:07 am 
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Location: Warren, MI, USA 48093-6744 N42.50973 W83.02633
zbiker wrote:
http://i268.photobucket.com/albums/jj22/zbiker62/PICT0126.jpg

lets try this


Try this

Image

Count me in with the G-G Majestic fans - I have a 1930 model 90 and a 1930 model 93, both with the 90-B chassis.

Yes, it's heavy...and yes, they sound wonderful!

A few shots of the 90-B chassis:

Image
Image

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PostPosted: Jan Thu 17, 2008 5:47 pm 
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Location: powell wyoming
thanks huggybear for getting the pic on site
oh and please pay no attention to my ultra clean shop :oops:
as you can tell im a little behind on my bi weekly cleaning :lol:
since i was unable to find a pic of this type of cabinet anywhere on the net should i put this in the gallery when its restored ??

buck


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PostPosted: Jan Fri 18, 2008 4:13 am 
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Location: Warren, MI, USA 48093-6744 N42.50973 W83.02633
zbiker wrote:
thanks huggybear for getting the pic on site
oh and please pay no attention to my ultra clean shop :oops:
as you can tell im a little behind on my bi weekly cleaning :lol:
since i was unable to find a pic of this type of cabinet anywhere on the net should i put this in the gallery when its restored ??

buck


You did the hard part of getting the picture here. Especially if you're using Photobucket, it's really easy.

Under each of your pictures there are four lines marked:

Email & IM
Direct Link
HTML Code
IMG Code

Click on the line that says IMG Code. Boom, it's on your clipboard.
Go into the message where you want to put it. If you have a PC, hit <control> V (at the same time). If you have a Mac, hit <apple> V at the same time.

All I had to do to make your picture show up was to add [ img ] (without the spaces) before it and [ /img ] (without the spaces) after it.

The old Majestics are fine sounding radios. I'm not surprised they sold well. Built like a tank - and weigh about the same as one too.

You do not want to see my shop!

Sorry to hijack the thread, but this is my Majestic 90 (with Havana guarding it)

Image

This radio was rescued from the trash - twice! It was a very sorry sight when I got it. Someone made a horrible attempt at "shabby chic" with it. I wish I would have taken some "before" pictures. It did not have legs, I threw these on. These pictures were taken while I attempted to clean the paint from the cabinet:

Image
Image
Image

This is the chassis after I finally got it playing. BTW, the chassis I posted before is out of my Majestic 93. This is a 90.

Image
Image
Image
Image

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PostPosted: Jan Fri 18, 2008 4:36 am 
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Location: Medford,Or USA
OHHH! Huggy! That looks WAAAAAAY better than mine in the underchassis picture. That is a neat job....beautiful!! :D Mine is a Majestic 91 and it sits... still crushing carpet fiber over there. When I finished mine, I still didn't nkow to neutralize my Neutradyne! And you know what a job it is to remove that behemoth chassis. You need help just to turn the monsters AROUND! But they DOOO sound good! :wink:
I'm always saying, "Well, I'll get to it soon." Right now, it has a LOT of "birdies" in the output! :lol:
YOU DA MAN!

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PostPosted: Jan Fri 18, 2008 11:27 am 
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Location: Warren, MI, USA 48093-6744 N42.50973 W83.02633
tubenutt wrote:
OHHH! Huggy! That looks WAAAAAAY better than mine in the underchassis picture. That is a neat job....beautiful!! :D Mine is a Majestic 91 and it sits... still crushing carpet fiber over there. When I finished mine, I still didn't nkow to neutralize my Neutradyne! And you know what a job it is to remove that behemoth chassis. You need help just to turn the monsters AROUND! But they DOOO sound good! :wink:
I'm always saying, "Well, I'll get to it soon." Right now, it has a LOT of "birdies" in the output! :lol:
YOU DA MAN!


Neutralizing it is a piece of cake.

Start at the back of the chassis and work your way forward. Pull out one of the #27s and wrap a piece of very thin tape around one of the filament pins. I used splicing tape, but most people can't get it. Use that thin clear packaging tape.

Plug the tube back in, put the shield on it, then adjust the neutralizing screw for MINIMUM volume. Then move to the next one, and the next one. It is best to do this using each tube that will actually be in that spot (due to variations in interelectrode capacitance). That's what I did - takes a little longer but you know it's right.

The adjusting screw on the 90-B chassis is at ground potential - I used a plain metal 1/4" nutdriver (I advise you to check it with a meter first in case I'm wrong!). But if you get used to this, then you get to work on a Philco, note that the trimmers on a Philco are HOT!! Don't ask me how I know this...

It's really an excellent sounding radio.

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 Post subject: Re: just how rare grigsby-grunow
PostPosted: Nov Thu 03, 2011 5:24 pm 
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what does neutralizing mean?

Tom Marino


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 Post subject: Re: just how rare grigsby-grunow
PostPosted: Nov Thu 03, 2011 6:41 pm 
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Count me in as well! Model 92 with the Model 90 chassis, sn 9A-183085.

Heavy!!!

Mike

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 Post subject: Re: just how rare grigsby-grunow
PostPosted: Nov Thu 03, 2011 7:46 pm 
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Location: Pocasset, Cape Cod, MA
Quote:
what does neutralizing mean?
Balancing out the grid-to-plate capacitance of the RF amplifier tubes, to allow more gain without causing oscillation.


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 Post subject: Re: just how rare grigsby-grunow
PostPosted: Nov Thu 03, 2011 9:03 pm 
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What is oscillation?

Tom


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 Post subject: Re: just how rare grigsby-grunow
PostPosted: Nov Thu 03, 2011 11:28 pm 
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Location: Pocasset, Cape Cod, MA
Whistling noises or worse as you tune across the dial.


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 Post subject: Re: just how rare grigsby-grunow
PostPosted: Nov Fri 04, 2011 3:45 am 
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I found that a tube is shot G80 'Where can I get one?

Tom


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 Post subject: Re: just how rare grigsby-grunow
PostPosted: Nov Fri 04, 2011 6:06 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 3408
Location: 253 Blanche St. Plymouth, MI USA
A few notes here.
First off, I recall reading somewhere that the Majestic 90 or 70 were in the top 3 quantity of radios sold in 1929. Due to the overbuilt nature, i bet they only made a couple dollars per set, not enough to bank when the depression hit. No other models by Grigsby Grunow seemed to have sold in anywhere near the quantities of the 70 and 90 series.

I think the AK 55 was the sales leader in 1929 ... maybe Alan Douglas can confirm. All of these are VERY common here in the midwest area. Come to MARC's Extravaganza in July and load your truck full of them. In my humble opinion, the 70 and 90 are good for boat anchoring, large door stopping, and not much else. The AK 55 on the other hand, is a durable radio, well made and you can cheat changing out the caps, just add fresh resistors and a fuse in the CT of the power xfmr. Cut out the "quality" tone cap and replace the one audio coupler cap and you are often good to go. You can run weak 45's in them too without batting an eye.

Next, the Majestic name shows up on a bunch of black stag portables around 1939-41 or so. There is an eagle on the metal grille and it say "Mighty Monarch of the Air" on them. Not sure if any connection to the earlier Grigsby-Grunow or General Household Utilities company (which seemingly died in late 1938).

Finally, do NOT confuse the later Majestic name on the Grundig line with anything earlier. That name seems to show up in the mid 50's, and actually had some connection with the Wilcox-Gay company of Charlotte, Mi, I guess they had some import deal on them, I dont know. LOTS of the Grundig Majestic radios were imported from Germany 1955-1964 or so. After '65 the quantity of them drops off sharply, although the portables remained popular thru today.

Mark Oppat
www.oldradioparts.net


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 Post subject: Re: just how rare grigsby-grunow
PostPosted: Jan Thu 05, 2012 1:35 am 
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Anyone looking for a good history of Grigsby-Grunow/Majestic can find it in the Sept./Oct. 2010 issue of Antique Radio Classified. Paul Turney wrote a well-researched history of the GG Majestic twists and turns in the 1920's and early 1930's, including their misadventures in refrigerator manufacturing (they planned to swipe some sales from Frigidaire and GE; it didn't happen). GG underwent a period of almost manic expansion in the period 1928-1932, setting up their own cabinet plant, buying the LaSalle tube manufacturing operation -- thus making their own tubes -- and making their own electrodynamic speakers. This last gambit got them sued by Magnavox, who held patents on the design, and eventually cost GG $400,000. This buying splurge probably was the main cause of GG's 1933-34 bankruptcy.
About they only thing Mr. Turney's history missed was GG's purchase of Columbia Records from the British recording giant EMI in 1931. GG issued records under both the Columbia and Majestic labels until 1934, when Columbia was sold in bankruptcy court for $75,000. As we all know, Columbia eventually wound up in the hands of CBS.
Following GG's demise, the Majestic name returned on products of the Majestic Radio and Television Corp. This iteration of Majestic never did make any TV sets, but I suppose the company name sounded impressive in the 1930's. Majestic R&T itself declared bankruptcy in 1948 and the pieces were picked up by the man who owned Wilcox-Gay and Grundig. The resulting products were initially called Grundig-Majestic and later Wilcox-Gay Majestic. Under this last name, Majestic did market a few TV sets under their own name but they were never a big player in the television set market. Wilcox-Gay itself went belly-up in the early 1960's.
It is most important when ordering-up schematics or other service information that the Majestic owner specify approximate year of manufacture and the company name. Majestic R&T used the same model numbers on some of their table radios as GG used on their earlier offerings.
Finally, William Grunow left GG some time prior to bankruptcy and founded General Household Utilities, makers of Grunow radios and -- surprise, surprise -- Grunow refrigerators. This company, which was not connected with Majestic R&T as far as I have been able to tell, itself went bust in 1937 or 1938. William Grunow supposedly wound up being a successful chicken farmer.
You should be able to access Paul Turney's excellent history at www.antiqueradio.com/SepOct10_Turney-Gr ... runow_Part 1.html.

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 Post subject: Re: just how rare grigsby-grunow
PostPosted: Jan Thu 05, 2012 2:47 am 
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Somewhere I read that the later Majestic company was formed by ex-Zenith employees; maybe Alan or Doug can confirm this, or add to it.

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 Post subject: Re: just how rare grigsby-grunow
PostPosted: Jan Thu 05, 2012 3:52 am 
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Yes, and the Commander exerted extreme pressure on their suppliers and bank to force them out of business.

AK was the sales leader in 1928, but I think Majestic took the top spot in 1929. Their huge fixed costs associated with their factories were what eventually did them in.


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 Post subject: Re: just how rare grigsby-grunow
PostPosted: Jan Thu 05, 2012 6:47 am 
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Location: columbia mo
G-G's financial diffficulties were first reported in Chicago newspapers in November 1933.

From the Chicago Daily News (an afternoon newspaper), November 24, 1933 --

"Grigsby-Grunow Receivership is Sought in Suit --

Application for the appointment of a receiver for the G-G Co, radio and refrigerator manufacturers, which came up this morning before Judge John P. Barnes in the United States District Court drew the ire of the court and after censuring the action of counsel for the company put off a decision on the case until later.

Receivership was asked in a bill filed by Peter R. Mallory and Co., of Indianapolis and New York who alleged they are creditors of the company to the extent of $14,785 for material. [The Chicago Tribune the following morning reported three other creditors: $26,350 due Joseph H. Tigerman for dividends and royalties; $204.00 to the Dwight Brothers Paper Copmpany and Lambert and Mann, a Chicago corporation with a claim for $20.00]

When Judge Barnes asked if the Grigsby company agreed to the appointment of a receiver, Attorney I.B. Lipson replied in its behalf that the company was willing to have a receiver named if LeRoi J. Williams, executivce vice-president and manager was named to the post.

This was regarded by Judge Barnes as dictation on the part of the company and he replied:
'It may be that Mr. Williams is the right man to be appointed, but I am serving notice that things such as this must stop. I will bring all such things such as this into the open as I am doing now. Has my conduct been such as to suggest such a procedure?'

There was a chorus of 'noes' from the attorneys present.

The bill alleges that the G-G Company is further indebted to other creditors in the amount of $2,907,06, a large part of which is past due and that it has $2,340,500 in bonds outstanding. The plaintiff also sets forth that while the assets are in excess of liabilities 'attempts to convert them into cash for the meeting of all obligations as they mature would result in the destruction of the defendant corporation as an operating unit and result in great financial loss to the plaintiff and all other creditors.'

Assets were set forth as amounting to $14,584,031.

The rise and fall of the G-G Company marks one of the highlights of the radio industry. The business of the company incorporated in 1921 was originally the manufacture of sun visors for automobile windshields. This was gradually expanded to other automobile accessories. With the growth of the radio industry, G-G entered that field and its rapid growth was one of the spectacular developments of the last era of prosperity. In 1930, operations were extended to the electrical refrigeration field. [From the Tribune article: "In 1930, the Majestic Household Utilities Corporation was formed as a subsidiary to manufacture electrical refrigerators. The subsidiary was later merged with the parent firm. It acquired a controlling interest in Columbia Phonograph."]

Plant facilities were expanded as the business grew. Sales rose from $5,861,225 the year ended May 31, 1928 to $49,318569 in the following fiscal year and to $61,330,217 in the year ended May 31, 1930.

Earnings reached their high in the year ended May 31, 1929 amounting to $5,114,612 after all charges. Despite a more than 20 percent gain in sales the following year, the net income dropped to $1,745,648. Since then, the company has been continuously in the red. The 1932 loss was $2,775,569. For the first nine months of this year the net loss was $2,215,520.

The financial position of the company has been growing worse, steadily and steadily. On May 31, 1929, it had a net working capital of $8,719,022; on Sept 30 last, this was down to less than $1,200,000. Cash amounted to but $189,872 on the latter date.

The company recently attempted to get a loan from the Reconstruction Finance Corporation, but so far has been unsuccessful...

G-G stock was one of the spectacular features of the last bull market. The original stock was sold in 1928 at about $32.00 a share, and considering subsequent stock split-ups, rose in 1929 to more than $1,100 a share, not allowing for valuable rights. The high on the present shares was $70. They sold as low as 50 cents in 1932 and are currently selling at about $1 a share.

'The principal causes of the company's financial embarrassments at this time is due to the impossibility of carrying the burden of its fixed investment in plant and equipment on the volume of business and profit now obtainable,' B.J. Grigsby, president and chairman of the board declared in a statement today.

'The popularity of the low priced midget radio sets reduced the value of the company and its large cabinet plant, and also made possible the entry into the already expanded radio industry of dozens of new small radio manufacturing companies with consequent price and profit demoralization. This competition resulted in heavy cash depletion and book losses.

'In the last six months due to changes in the operating management and further economies, the company has regained its position as a leader in the radio industry. Its employes [sic] increased from 1,973 on March 15, 1933 to 6,396 on Sept. 30, 1933. Due to a general business recession since that date, the number has decreased to 5,000.'"

Then, two Associated Press stories --

On February 20, 1934 -- "Judge John P. Barnes appointed Frank McKey as receiver in bankrupcy for the G-G Company... the company has been in equity receivership for several months... Bond of $150,000 was fixed the the bankruptcy receiver and Judge Barnes directed the sale of the company in the near future."

On January 24, 1935 -- "Creditors of the bankrupt G-G Company today agreed to an inital liquidating dividend of $900,000 to be paid within ten days to secured and unsecured creditors.

The appointment was on the basis of two-thirds for the bondholders and one-thirds for the unsecured creditors. Holders of the $2,400,000 in bonds will receive approximately 25 percent of their claims and holders of some $1,800,000 in unsecured claims will receive about 16 percent.

Frank M McKey, trustee in bankrupcy filed a report with a referee today showing a cash balance of $1,323,425 as of January 22. Assets of the company when it was placed in bankruptcy were appraised at more than $5,000,000.

The settlement was reached after several months of conferences between Mr. McKey, A.L. Schapiro, trustee's attorney; James O. Carr, Pittsburgh, chairman of the bondholders' committee representing $1,900,000 in bonds and N.B. Parsons, representing unsecured creditors listing some $550,000 in claims."

Then, and finally the auction!


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 Post subject: Re: just how rare grigsby-grunow
PostPosted: Jan Thu 05, 2012 1:05 pm 
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Tim Tress wrote:
Somewhere I read that the later Majestic company was formed by ex-Zenith employees; maybe Alan or Doug can confirm this, or add to it.


Alan Douglas wrote:
Yes, and the Commander exerted extreme pressure on their suppliers and bank to force them out of business.


If I recall correctly, Grigsby-Grunow supplied faulty power supply packs to Zenith which were used in the 30/40 model series. These failed en masse and really soured the Commander with Majestic.
He carefully kept track the company and after they went bankrupt bought the G-G factory for a song.

Could it have been a stab in the back that the ex-Zenith employees chose the Majestic name?

-Steve

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 Post subject: Re: just how rare grigsby-grunow
PostPosted: Jan Thu 05, 2012 1:37 pm 
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Interesting reading.

Ironically, some of their "Smart Sets" from circa 1933-1934 are among the most collectable and sought after radios all these years later.
I have the Royale model 85 Smart Set console (shown in the original ad below) and its a nice looker and players vey nicely.

Image
Image

Note the trademark ebony squared knobs common on the smart sets that year.
Image


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 Post subject: Re: just how rare grigsby-grunow
PostPosted: Jan Thu 05, 2012 1:53 pm 
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Location: Sheridan, Wyoming
A couple years ago I did some work on a 1934 Ford car radio for a friend. This was one of the jobs where the radio case mounted to the firewall and a separate control head was meant to be installed on the dash in place of the ashtray.. Riveted on the outside of the radio case was a metal tag on which was stamped "Grigsby-Grunow." Inside, however, it was all Philco. On the inside of one of the lids was a tube and component layout chart labeled "Philadelphia Storage Battery Co.", and just about everything, including filter caps and the vibrator (which still worked!) had "Philco" on it.
The chassis fit the case perfectly so this was not some home brew project. I believe GG had a contract with Ford to supply radios, so I wonder if, while in the throws of receivership, they subcontracted the project out to Philco. Or did Philco -- another Ford supplier along with Zenith -- just buy a bunch of GG cases on the cheap and, if so, why wouldn't they remove the GG name tag?
By the way, I have a dozen or so Majestics made both by GG and Majestic Radio & Television Corp. My favorite, at least as far as looks goes, is a Model 463 Century Six. This appears to have been made early in the production run when GG still had some walnut veneer left in their cabinet plant. Later versions I have seen used poplar or some other cheap no grain wood, hidden by an opaque finish.

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