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 Post subject: Re: Coil winding machines
PostPosted: Jan Sat 06, 2018 12:01 am 
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If you want gears, here's another idea; :wink:


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 Post subject: Re: Coil winding machines
PostPosted: Jan Thu 11, 2018 2:24 am 
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Joined: Aug Wed 30, 2006 4:46 pm
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Location: Milwaukee, WI
Just in case this was overlooked ..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FIOocMoRsYQ


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 Post subject: Re: Coil winding machines
PostPosted: Jan Thu 11, 2018 6:15 am 
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Joined: Sep Wed 10, 2014 2:01 am
Posts: 1695
Location: Costa Mesa, California
That was a very cool video of the Gingery machine in action. I have received the book and read it--24 pages--not a big volume. It has some good ideas--especially the friction wheel, because it can be varied easily to create the ratio needed to wind a universal coil. I have ordered a winding machine with a drill chuck to hold the coil spindle. It was the least expensive and allows for a 1/4" diameter core--something none of the other simple machines did. It will be my starting point. My core rod will be a length of 1/4" all-thread and on it next to the chuck will mount a 3" pulley for a 1/4" round rubber belt that will lead to another pulley that will serve as the friction wheel. The friction wheel engages the friction drive plate which can be positioned for the correct number of revolutions to send the wire guide back and forth, creating the pattern of the universal coil. I haven't decided if I want a cam to slide the wire guide back and forth or a wheel with an off center arm connection and have the wire guide pivot back and forth over the coil. The pivot point is adjusted for the length of the coil instead of having a cam that needs to be custom made each time for each different length coil.

Once I get the winding machine--a few days out yet--I will start experimenting with constructing the moving wire guide arm arrangement. I do like the guide pictured in Gingery's book and shown in the video. I have an assortment of Garolite tubes that came yesterday. I want to find a good source for Litz wire, although it is on EBay and I have some from other projects. Other things to figure out yet are iron cores, ferrite cores (Surplus Sales of Nebraska), and cans.

Norm

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 Post subject: Re: Coil winding machines
PostPosted: Jan Thu 11, 2018 3:13 pm 
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Location: S. Dartmouth MA 02748-1225 USA
When I had my Lesonna winders, I discovered it is near impossible to hit the exact ratio to where the winding exactly overlays. Meaning, it will work no matter what. The bobbin was turning about three revolutions per stroke across the form.


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 Post subject: Re: Coil winding machines
PostPosted: Jan Wed 31, 2018 2:57 am 
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Location: Costa Mesa, California
Okay, time passes. I studied the Gingery book and it contributed to my idea of how this machine would get built. The main take-away was the rubber friction wheel against the friction plate for an infinitely variable ratio of back-and-forth versus turns. I also liked the guide arm and used some of its features. My machine started with an existing winder that I purchased on EBay for $90 including shipping. It was the only one that could take a 1/4" all-thread rod and I wanted the ability to wind 1/4" core coils so the standard ferrite slugs would work. All the parts were from the local hardware or McMaste -Carr where I bought the pulleys and urethane O-ring. The one pulley had to be modified to allow the belt to contact the friction plate (large fender washer). I used some bushings for the parts that couldn't be bought with 1/4" holes. I modified the pulley and squared up some of the cuts and the brackets with a wide-belt table sander at work. The pulley was secured to all-thread and then spun with a drill motor while applying the edge to the sander.

The base is 1/4" cold rolled steel that has been drilled and tapped for #10-24 screws. I would suggest in the future using a plywood base initially to get all the locations where they should be, but I didn't and just lucked out. The steel plate is heavy, secure, and gives very solid mounting. Plus, it allows the use of a magnetic base for the arm holder. That way a person can easily adjust location for the coil size, length, position on the core. A #16 wire link is used to transfer the back and forth action. Any size can be quickly bent for the situation.

So, my first coil was a learning opportunity and now I need to make a few minor tweaks. More posts as I get this rolling.

Norm


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