Forums :: Resources :: Features :: Photo Gallery :: Vintage Radio Shows :: Archives :: Books
Support This Site: Contributors :: Advertise


It is currently Sep Wed 19, 2018 7:52 pm


All times are UTC [ DST ]





Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 32 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Oddball screw
PostPosted: Feb Wed 28, 2018 10:55 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jul Mon 26, 2010 8:30 pm
Posts: 23342
Location: Annapolis, MD
Needed a screw for a 1940s V-M changer. After 10 minutes with the scrounge box, I finally found the right one. It looked like a fat 4-40, and seemed to have 40 threads per inch. At first I thought it was metric, but it turns out to be a 5-40 (the first one I have ever encountered)
How many know of----or have used---all these sizes:
0-80
1-72
2-56
3-48
4-40
5-40

_________________
-Mark http://pixellany.com

"It's always something". --Gilda Radner (1946 - 1989)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Oddball screw
PostPosted: Feb Wed 28, 2018 11:02 am 
Member

Joined: Feb Wed 07, 2018 6:52 pm
Posts: 325
Location: Stone Mountain, GA
I have taps for all those sizes and have used them except 5-40.

5-32 is another I have seen. Last I saw was one of the first import clone PC's. They used 5-32 instead of the standard 6-32.

That 0-80 tap scares me ;) Just dropping it can break it.

Used 2-56 just last year to make a indexed tooling holder for may lathe.

The real tiny stuff came from my grandfather as we built model trains long ago (when engines and cars were made of steel and brass.)

_________________
Scott.
Powered by infinite improbability drive.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Oddball screw
PostPosted: Feb Wed 28, 2018 11:06 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Nov Mon 02, 2009 7:01 am
Posts: 2969
Location: Lincoln City, OR
Greetings to Mark and the Forum:

#5-40 is actually fairly common.... it is the screw size that is used in a lot of barrier-type terminal strips. Unfortunately, I don't own a #5-40 tap.... At least I don't remember owning one.

Regards,

_________________
Jim T.
KB6GM


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Oddball screw
PostPosted: Feb Wed 28, 2018 1:17 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Mar Wed 11, 2015 1:46 am
Posts: 1106
Location: Boiling Springs, PA
5-40 is common with firearms along with a bunch of other unusual threads. I have a stash of gun screw kits but they probably arent the type you need. McMaster Carr has 5-40 sizes.

_________________
Jeff-W3JKO

"Things are more like they are now than they ever were before" -D. Eisenhower


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Oddball screw
PostPosted: Feb Wed 28, 2018 2:15 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 13745
Location: Fernandina Beach, FL
Thanks Mark, I just ordered three different "odd" size taps that I didn't have.

_________________
Don


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Oddball screw
PostPosted: Feb Wed 28, 2018 2:24 pm 
Member

Joined: Jul Sun 13, 2008 4:02 pm
Posts: 102
Location: Scranton, PA 18505
I’ve seen 4-40 in DOD equipment I’ve worked on but not the others. I thought that seemed like an awfully fine thread for a screw that small but what do I know.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Oddball screw
PostPosted: Feb Wed 28, 2018 2:37 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jul Mon 26, 2010 8:30 pm
Posts: 23342
Location: Annapolis, MD
Don Cavey wrote:
Thanks Mark, I just ordered three different "odd" size taps that I didn't have.

He who dies with th most tools wins......;)

_________________
-Mark http://pixellany.com

"It's always something". --Gilda Radner (1946 - 1989)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Oddball screw
PostPosted: Feb Wed 28, 2018 2:47 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 1514
Location: Sullivan, MO
I use 4-40 quite a bit. 3-48 was used on the WWII aircraft command radio equipment (ARC-5, SCR-274N. ARA/ATA). I have also used 2-56 in the past.

One that I encountered fairly recently is the 6-56. That is the thread for the trimmer capacitor adjustment of the 1940 (and probably other years) Zenith tuning presets. I had one on a 12S-471 that had been over-tightened and sheared the brass body. I purchased the tap and die and fabricated a new one from some brass sheet stock and tubing.

_________________
Sean
WØKPX

If it ain't broke, take it apart and see how it works.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Oddball screw
PostPosted: Feb Wed 28, 2018 2:51 pm 
Member

Joined: Sep Tue 30, 2014 6:08 am
Posts: 3031
Location: The Old Dominion VA 23518
Ought-80, 1-72, 2-56 and 4-40 are common in most older instruments. In the Navy, we had a bin with all of those sizes in fillister head - stainless steel, for the non-magnetic properties.

3-48 is an uncommon size - I have it only on my screw sizing gauges.

BTW, if any of you are looking for an inexpensive set of gauges for both Metric and SAE machine screws, I highly recommend the gauges that MicroFasteners sell. I have the set, and just went through a sorting of 86 pounds of machine screws - and they proved to be very handy:

https://www.microfasteners.com/product. ... 259&page=1

Attachment:
gauges.jpg
gauges.jpg [ 97.16 KiB | Viewed 730 times ]


Smallish, but they include all the sizes Mark mentioned and has the handy metric sizes as well.

_________________
Brian
"Capacitor Cosmetologist since 1979"
USN Retired 1984-2006 (Avionics/Cal)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Oddball screw
PostPosted: Feb Wed 28, 2018 4:02 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 1350
Garrard head shells from the 40's through the 60's used a 6BA (British Association standard ) thread.

It looks like a fat 4-40, but it's not.

_________________
I don't believe in experts. That's why I take my car to a plumber and my taxes to a chef.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Oddball screw
PostPosted: Feb Wed 28, 2018 5:00 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Dec Sun 21, 2014 6:37 am
Posts: 1606
Location: Portland, TN, USA
Findm-Keepm wrote:

BTW, if any of you are looking for an inexpensive set of gauges for both Metric and SAE machine screws, I highly recommend the gauges that MicroFasteners sell. I have the set, and just went through a sorting of 86 pounds of machine screws - and they proved to be very handy:

https://www.microfasteners.com/product. ... 259&page=1

Smallish, but they include all the sizes Mark mentioned and has the handy metric sizes as well.


Thanks for the link, Brian. Another $23 gone from my paypal account, as I'd been looking for gauges like this for some time.

_________________
73, de Chuck K4CCW

"The question is not what you look at, but what you see." Thoreau


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Oddball screw
PostPosted: Mar Thu 01, 2018 1:40 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 1998
Location: Oswego, NY, USA
Growing up near Bluffton, I remember some of the Triplett engineers and machinists bragging about making machine screw sizes for their new model testers that no other company had. If every company had that attitude, no wonder there's so many sizes; not to mention the various, oddball metric sizes. Last month, our local church's Samick (mfg. in S. Korea) 1990's electronic wood-cased piano case leg fell off. So, before disassembling the case to get at the leg hardware, I emailed Samick/U.S. in NC, asking them what sizes of metric machine nuts to take for the repair. It took them a month to get back, with a non-definitive answer. So I took along one of each size metric nut (20 different sizes, each labeled w/ a Sharpie), and sure enough , the size that fit the leg stud was nowhere near what they said it would be. Turns out that the factory had never installed the main/large metric nut to secure the case leg; so it took 20 yrs of use for it to fall off. Today at work, I received some new U.S.-made CGA580 gas regulators, where some of the gauge screws were missing; they were 5-40, plated-cap-head-T12-torx...pretty odd size but I had some to fix it. Apparently, companies use unusual sizes on purpose.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Oddball screw
PostPosted: Mar Thu 01, 2018 2:06 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 33187
Location: Maryland 20709, USA
pixellany wrote:
How many know of----or have used---all these sizes:
0-80
1-72
2-56
3-48
4-40
5-40
I stock all of those and others in that size range.
Some of which include 3-36, 3-48, 4-48, etc.

Look at the taps available at McMaster-Carr at http://www.mcmaster.com

- Leigh

_________________
73 de W3NLB
http://www.AtwaterKent.info
Click "Grebe Stuff" for Synchrophase info


Last edited by Leigh on Mar Thu 01, 2018 2:45 am, edited 2 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Oddball screw
PostPosted: Mar Thu 01, 2018 2:42 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 12576
Location: S. Dartmouth MA 02748-1225 USA
I encountered 5-40 hardware on a Lessona textile winder from the 1900's, bought the tap and die from McMaster.

Just bought some .177 air pistol cleaning tools, all 5-40 thread... :roll:

Quote:
and just went through a sorting of 86 pounds of machine screws
And I thought I was obsessive sorting some 50# of totally mixed hardware. A 80 year accumulation of electronic salvage fasteners.

It is RARE indeed I need to get screws at ACE hardware... Yeppers, to mount the auto-tuner in the Zenith 53, FWIR 10-24x1-1/4" long...

Sorting fasteners is as much fun as sorting carbon resistors. A snowy day project...

Chas


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Oddball screw
PostPosted: Mar Thu 01, 2018 3:17 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 1350
Thank goodness for Ace - the last of the REAL hardware stores, at least chain-wise.

_________________
I don't believe in experts. That's why I take my car to a plumber and my taxes to a chef.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Oddball screw
PostPosted: Mar Thu 01, 2018 3:24 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Mon 18, 2010 2:13 am
Posts: 17028
Location: Dayton Ohio
We had the 3-48 and 5-40 size screws in the stock room where I worked a few years ago. I used them on rare occasion.

2-56 is a common size I use, though I did buy some 0-80 and 1-72 screws for the Bradleyometer projects I've been working on.
I want to do some 0-80 tapping into brass, but wow, I think the tap would break if I looked at it cross-eyed.

-Steve

_________________
Radio Interests
-Zenith
-Sparton
-Pre-War FM
Consoles and floor models, the bigger, the better!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Oddball screw
PostPosted: Mar Thu 01, 2018 3:36 am 
Member

Joined: Sep Tue 30, 2014 6:08 am
Posts: 3031
Location: The Old Dominion VA 23518
Chas wrote:
.......

Quote:
and just went through a sorting of 86 pounds of machine screws
And I thought I was obsessive sorting some 50# of totally mixed hardware. A 80 year accumulation of electronic salvage fasteners.


Sorting fasteners is as much fun as sorting carbon resistors. A snowy day project...

Chas


'Twas an eBay buy back in 2004 or 2005 - I paid for the shipping twice, as the outer box was buckling and UPS refused the parcel. Seller contacted me, asked for 14 dollars more for the third outer box and additional weight, so I gladly paid. Not a screw or nut lost - and delivered to my door intact. It was a combination of hardware from both a telecom company and an optical (Meret?) company, all mixed together, with a lot in bags, but some 40+ pounds in bags all mixed up.

I got 200 nice hanging clear plastic boxes from an ebay seller, and did a couple of gross sorts of the hardware - by size initially, and then by magnetic attraction with a weak alnico magnet, so as to not pick up the slightly magnetic stainless stuff. Then it was a "fine" sort with a sifter tray with 5/16" squarish holes that let the smaller stuff through. Another pick with the magnet, and I now had 7 "gross" sort bags. The smallest stuff, mostly 1-72 and 2-56 screws and #2 washers, was saved for last - there was a large coffee can full of that. I had to go and buy 400 more of the clear hanging boxes - I have about 40 or so left, so about I have 550 individual types/sizes of stuff, mostly in quantities of about 200 or less of each. WIth the screw gauge, I quickly sorted it all out, finding tons of M2.5, M3, 4-40, 2-56, and strangely, hundreds of 10-32 hardware in all heads and drive combinations. Also mixed in were about 100 or so 39K 1/2 watt short leaded resistors, dozens of solderless connectors, and enough brass shim material (all .006" thick...) to last a lifetime.

Now to tackle my late dad's 30 year drawer(s) of hardware - TV and stereo stuff, and most of it I collected, as I was his junk/strip/sort/store flunky.

Fun, and my daughter helped. She thought it was "cool" to discover a new size we didn't already have cataloged. 8)

EDIT - as to carbon resistors - sort by wattage first, then by the multiplier band, then to value. Makes quick work. I did half a triwall/gaylord of resistors that way back in the 90s. Gave away a bunch, but still have a lot of those resistors - most are the five band reliability coded stuff.

_________________
Brian
"Capacitor Cosmetologist since 1979"
USN Retired 1984-2006 (Avionics/Cal)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Oddball screw
PostPosted: Mar Thu 01, 2018 3:41 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 33187
Location: Maryland 20709, USA
azenithnut wrote:
I want to do some 0-80 tapping into brass, but wow, I think the tap would break if I looked at it cross-eyed.
Hi Steve,

Try a 0000-160

- Leigh

_________________
73 de W3NLB
http://www.AtwaterKent.info
Click "Grebe Stuff" for Synchrophase info


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Oddball screw
PostPosted: Mar Thu 01, 2018 3:55 am 
Member

Joined: Sep Tue 30, 2014 6:08 am
Posts: 3031
Location: The Old Dominion VA 23518
azenithnut wrote:
We had the 3-48 and 5-40 size screws in the stock room where I worked a few years ago. I used them on rare occasion.

2-56 is a common size I use, though I did buy some 0-80 and 1-72 screws for the Bradleyometer projects I've been working on.
I want to do some 0-80 tapping into brass, but wow, I think the tap would break if I looked at it cross-eyed.

-Steve



As to ought-80 tapping, I had a box-of-rocks machinist tap a bronze gem/glass/lens holder for me. He heated the bronze on a hot plate, inserted the chucked tap in the now enlarged hole a mm or so, and backed it out gently using the spindle, and repeated, until he had a mm or so of threads. Then he cut the threads as normal, with cutting fluid that was clear and very thin. Interesting to watch, and patient he was. It worked fine and I got a threaded hole 3/8" deep. Bread and butter work to him.

Talented machinist, but no common sense. Arrested once for stealing about 80 watermelons. He got caught and asked why he took so many - "they were all there, and I just didn't know when to stop." He paid restitution, and did a first time offender (he was 42.. :shock: ...) program that got him -by chance- a prime job as a machinist for an aviation overhaul company. I happened upon him once in the Rome airport, both of us waiting for different flights - his to Athens, mine back to JFK and home.

_________________
Brian
"Capacitor Cosmetologist since 1979"
USN Retired 1984-2006 (Avionics/Cal)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Oddball screw
PostPosted: Mar Thu 01, 2018 4:07 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 33187
Location: Maryland 20709, USA
The critical aspects of tapping are rigidity and alignment.

You won't do 0-80 with a tap handle, unless you're really lucky.
You need to use a tapping machine or device.
Those hold the tap perpendicular to the work.

- Leigh

_________________
73 de W3NLB
http://www.AtwaterKent.info
Click "Grebe Stuff" for Synchrophase info


Top
 Profile  
 
Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 32 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: fifties and 6 guests



Search for:
Jump to:  
























Privacy Policy :: Powered by phpBB