Forums :: Resources :: Features :: Photo Gallery :: Vintage Radio Shows :: Archives :: Books
Support This Site: Contributors :: Advertise


It is currently Oct Tue 21, 2014 1:35 am


All times are UTC [ DST ]



Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 17 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: What are the marine radio bands on HF?
PostPosted: Mar Thu 07, 2013 11:19 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jun Mon 20, 2011 6:09 pm
Posts: 430
Location: N Cen Mn
A friend of mine wants me to help him install an antenna on his sailboat and find a good used SSB transceiver for marine radio. I looked at the Icom site and find that they transmit all over the HF spectrum. I can't figure this out. I can't design the antenna until I know what freq's he will be using. Any one there to give me a quick primer?

_________________
Prediction is difficult, especially about the future. Niels Bohr


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What are the marine radio bands on HF?
PostPosted: Mar Fri 08, 2013 12:29 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Wed 19, 2011 5:28 pm
Posts: 997
Location: mid-Michigan
I don't think there are any, aside from the VHF channels. Offshore sailboats may or may not have a crew member who has a ham license, but that would involve use of the normal ham bands. I know there are some nets on the ham bands intended for sailors, such as the "Chubasco Net" if it still operates. Most offshore boats carry EPIRBs for sending out an emergency beacon. Probably 20 meters would be the most useful HF band for offshore sailors.
-DS


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What are the marine radio bands on HF?
PostPosted: Mar Fri 08, 2013 12:38 am 
Member

Joined: Jun Sat 30, 2012 9:26 pm
Posts: 819
Marine radios are still chanalized and restricted to ITU USB channels between 2-22mhz. If the radio supports a free entry frequency mode, it's usually because there's been a mod or the radio can be expanded by programming or dealer setup for full access and not normally installed by dealers or delivered that way. FCC type acceptance limits the user interface to channel entry for licenesees holding restricted or third class radiotelephone permits. HF marine still does exist, althouh it's become rather specialized for most users.

In over 35 years, I can count on one hand how many times I've seen a trapped or broadband TW type antenna installed on a pleasure craft. Marine radios are designed to work with a long wire or 21'/35'whip tuner. Early ones used a mechanical leedex rotary selector that tracked the channel switch for a pretuned position, latter units used servo motor controlled tuning controlled by a phase detector arrangement, present units since the late 80's at least count the frequency and use a microprocessor to look up cap/coil combinations from a table built from previously determined tunings. if you're looking for ITU lists, I'm sure you can find them on the coast guard's website, the FCC's and numerous monitoring websites.

I hope that your "friend" doesn't have any illusions of using an amateur radio in place of the real thing. A good solid marine radio that won't break the bank is any one of the Icom m700 series. Anything made by SEA, Raytheon/JSC, or Furuno is dependable. Anything made by Hull or SGC is an orphan now and most marine service centers won't touch them. If an HF radio is necessary, it would probably be better to purchase something very recent that's capable of data and DSC capability such as Icom's 802 or one of the Furuno units as many larger ships no longer monitor 2182 and instead monitor an automated scan list for a DSC alert. Even if voice communication isn't possible, a DSC string with GPS data will still get through. There's very little monitoring of HF anymore as most has gone satcom or DSC and remaining coast stations are mostly specialied data/e-mail. IIRC, WLO is the last station still providing ship to shore service on limited watch and what if any watch is still being done by the CG, I don't know. I've been out of the business for quite a while. Very few SSB sets are being installed anymore due to alternatives and the mass closing of shore stations during the 90's telcom consolidations and implementation of GMDSS.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What are the marine radio bands on HF?
PostPosted: Mar Fri 08, 2013 1:10 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: May Sun 08, 2011 10:45 pm
Posts: 2995
Location: Southern Calif
You need a fixed length antenna [the backstay makes an excellent antenna with suitable insulators] and an auto tuner.
I used to use an ICOM IC735 with an AH-1 tuner in my sailboat feeding the backstay and ran the ground into the lead keel when I worked "maritime mobile".

Just about any of the ICOM Marine HF radios with an AT140 auto tuner will work.

_________________
It's easier to make a steam powered lobster trap than a lobster powered steam trap


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What are the marine radio bands on HF?
PostPosted: Mar Fri 08, 2013 1:14 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Wed 19, 2011 5:28 pm
Posts: 997
Location: mid-Michigan
Dawn sounds like he knows what he's talking about. Jeanne Socrates, the oldest woman to do a solo circumnavigation, called the Maritime Mobile Service Net on 14,300 KHz to report that her liferaft had inflated accidently and she'd had to cut it loose. This happened a few months ago when she was off the Oregon coast and I happened to be listening. Her signal was very faint here in Michigan and she was having trouble getting her message heard and understood. My point is that for pleasure boaters, the ham bands and the VHF and the EPIRB are what is used.
-DS


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What are the marine radio bands on HF?
PostPosted: Mar Fri 08, 2013 1:23 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Mar Fri 14, 2008 1:40 pm
Posts: 8797
Location: SE USA
There is a substantial amount of illegal "personal" communications going on in the SW spectrum with sailboaters, etc. Pick a frequency and yakk back home.

_________________
The beatings will continue until the morale improves


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What are the marine radio bands on HF?
PostPosted: Mar Fri 08, 2013 1:39 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jun Mon 20, 2011 6:09 pm
Posts: 430
Location: N Cen Mn
I seem to be getting more confused with all the answers. First, he is not trying to use a ham radio. I looked at the Icom m802 specs and this is the frequency slots:
Frequency coverage
Tx
1.6– 2.9999, 4.0– 4.9999, 6.0– 6.9999
8.0– 8.9999, 12.0– 13.9999, 16.0– 17.9999
18.0– 19.9999, 22.0– 22.9999, 25.0– 27.5000
It looks like these sailors can go anywhere they want to.

_________________
Prediction is difficult, especially about the future. Niels Bohr


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What are the marine radio bands on HF?
PostPosted: Mar Fri 08, 2013 1:52 am 
Member

Joined: Apr Sun 15, 2012 3:10 pm
Posts: 585
Location: Buffalo, NY
http://www.navcen.uscg.gov/doc/rtchan.txt

No, you can't just transmit anywhere you want.
Especially if ya expect to reach someone who can help you on the other end.

Ton of information here.
http://www.navcen.uscg.gov/

Every time I worked on Ocean Going vessels, in a previous life, it was for RTTY (SITOR / ARQ) systems.
The Radio Operator on board would always have a list of their favorite stations printed out
and taped to the front of the transmitter rack, and they would always want to make sure
the system would work properly for them. So I'd always make sure to run thru as many of them as possible with them
before I left (propagation conditions permitting obviously).


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What are the marine radio bands on HF?
PostPosted: Mar Fri 08, 2013 2:23 am 
Member

Joined: Jun Sat 30, 2012 9:26 pm
Posts: 819
Those are the approximate regions that the marine frequency allocations are. Note that you don't see the amateur bands in those swatches which are around 9, 1 meg chunks out of 30 mhz.
Those specs are also representative of pre-programmed USB or Sitor channel numbers that are predominantly public correspondence half duplex pairs and only a handfull of simplex channels that can be used boat to boat, CG, or to a private shore station. Most all the radios can be entered into a complete access mode that allows direct frequency entry and also allows the use of LSB in the full HF spectrum. Many carry type acceptance for aviation, business, and other services as well despite being marketed as a marine radio and other frequencies can be programmed in a user channel mode.

While a ham radio is legal to be used by anyone on any frequency in an emergency, it is not allowed to be used by a ham or non ham on the marine channels. Hams have marine nets that mariners who are hams use. They are not to be used by non-amateurs. A commercial/marine SSB radio is perfectly legal to use on the ham bands by hams, but not visa versa. Any ham net would respond to your friend in an emergency as a non-ham, but wouldn't tolerate him participating as a non-ham for regular net check-ins.

Unfortunately, as I mentioned before, marine SSB has seen a major decline in recent years in the infrastructure to support public correspondence and shore watch. It might do your friend well to consider obtaining an amateur license where at least there are well organized nets that can be accessed via ssb. Then there becomes another problem. If an amateur radio is on board a vessel, by law, it cannot be co-located with the ships communications gear. That generally isn't a problem with anyone if it does and was put in place to keep folks from fudging with amateur radio gear. It's better to use a dual use radio such as the Icom with a ham ticket.

The reasons may not be obvious why this is so, but it's there to protect the users. Marine radios do have higher frequency tolerances, but the main point is safety. You can punch in ITU channel 401 or turn a knob and immediately talk with the antenna ready. Not so with amateur radios where the frequency has to be dialed in, mode set, tuner tuned, etc. In an emergency, there's too many things to go wrong with a non-technical/amateur user. Furthermore, these radios are designed to operate under wide voltage ranges that where an amateur radio may not want to work on a discharged battery, the marine one is designed to. Marine radios also are designed for marine enviormental integrity. Salt air and moisture isn't going to affect a radio made for marine service like it would an amateur set. certain frequencies in a marine radio are designed to operate in USB with a bit of carrier on the signal for signalling purposes. 2182 khz has to be immediately accessible, am compatible and also have a warbling audio alarm function. Even the transmit indicator has to show that real RF is being generated and modulated, not just a ptt activated red light or transmit indicator.

Hope this is less confusing.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What are the marine radio bands on HF?
PostPosted: Mar Fri 08, 2013 3:07 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Wed 19, 2011 5:28 pm
Posts: 997
Location: mid-Michigan
Phil Coe wrote:
It looks like these sailors can go anywhere they want to.

We go where the wind blows. :lol:
-DS


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What are the marine radio bands on HF?
PostPosted: Mar Fri 08, 2013 7:18 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Mar Mon 17, 2008 5:05 am
Posts: 3847
Location: Palmerston North, New Zealand
Ok I give up. I can't post a txt file, I can't post a pdf file so here you are - a cut'n'paste. You may have to insert it into a spreadsheet to sort out the columns.

Maritime HF Band Plan
Frequency/Range User Mode Remarks
4000 - 4063 SHIP USB INTERSHIP SIMPLEX / CROSS BAND WITH 8 MHZ DUPLEX WITH COAST ON 4438 - 4650 / SUPPL. FOR DUPLEX ON USB CH. 401-429
4063.3 - 4064.8 SHIP DATA 6 SHIP OR BUOY CHANNELS (0.3 KHZ) FOR OCEANOGRAPHIC DATA TRANSMISSIONS
4065 - 4143 SHIP USB SHIP CH. 401 - 427 DUPLEX WITH COAST STATIONS ON 4357 - 4435
4125 BOTH USB CHANNEL 421 - SIMPLEX. SUPPLEMENTS 2182 FOR DISTRESS AND SAFETY
4146 BOTH USB SIMPLEX AND CROSSBAND FREQ. WX & NAV WARNING FREQ. MAY BE USED WITH CH. 428/429 (4351/4354) FOR DUPLEX
4149 BOTH USB SIMPLEX AND CROSSBAND FREQ. WX & NAV WARNING FREQ. MAY BE USED WITH CH. 428/429 (4351/4354) FOR DUPLEX
4154 - 4170 SHIP MISC 5 CHANNELS SPACED 4 KHZ APART FOR FAX, DATA AND OTHER SPECIAL TRANSMISSIONS
4172.5 - 4181.5 SHIP SITOR-A 4 MHZ SHIP RTTY BAND - PAIRED WITH COAST STATIONS OPERATING ON 4210.5 - 4219. MAY ALSO BE USED FOR CW WORKING.
4177.5 BOTH RTTY SIMPLEX (CH. 411) DISTRESS/SAFETY TFC ONLY
4182 - 4186.5 SHIP CW 10 CALLING CHANNELS .5 KHZ APART
4187 - 4202 SHIP CW SHIP CW WORKING CHANNELS - .5 KHZ APART
4202.5 - 4207 SHIP SITOR/CW 10 NON-PAIRED SITOR-A TRANSMITTING CHANNELS SPACED .5 KHZ APART. ALSO USED FOR SHIP CW WORKING FREQS
4207.5 - 4209 SHIP DSC 4 SHIP CHANNELS .5 KHZ APART FOR DIGITAL SELECTIVE CALLING (DSC). 4207.5 MAY BE USED BY COAST FOR DISTRESS/SAFETY
4209.5 COAST SITOR-B NAVTEX BROADCASTS
4210 COAST SITOR-B MARINE SAFETY INFO BROADCASTS
4210.5 - 4219 COAST SITOR-A 4 MHZ COAST RTTY BAND - .5 KHZ APART
4219.5 - 4220.5 COAST DSC 3 COAST STATION DIGITAL SELECTIVE CLG CHAN'S
4221 - 4351 COAST CW MARITIME CW COAST STATIONS
4351 - 4354 COAST USB CH. 428 & 429 - PAIRED WITH 4146 AND 4149
4357 - 4435 COAST USB COAST STATION USB DUPLEX BAND
6200 - 6525 SHIP USB 6 MHZ SHIP USB BAND - 8 CHANNELS PAIRED WITH COAST STATIONS ON 6501 - 6522
6210.4 COAST USB LIMITED COASTAL STATIONS - SIMPLEX
6212.4 BOTH USB WGK ST. LOUIS, INLAND WATERWAY SIMPLEX
6213.5 BOTH USB LIMITED COASTAL STATIONS
6215 SHIP USB CHANNEL 606 - CALLING/SAFETY/DISTRESS
6224 - 6230 BOTH USB SIMPLEX LIMITED COASTAL STATIONS
6235 - 6259 SHP VARIOUS 7 SHIP CHANNELS, 4 KHZ WIDE, FOR FAX, DATA AND OTHER SPECIAL TRANSMISSIONS
6261.3 - 6262.5 SHIP DATA 5 CHANNELS, SPACED .3 KHZ APART, FOR SHIP OR BUOY DATA TRANSMISSIONS
6263 - 6275.5 SHIP SITOR-A 6 MHZ SHIP RTTY BAND
6268 BOTH RTTY SIMPLEX (CH. 611) FOR SAFETY/DISTRESS ONLY
6277 - 6280.5 SHIP CW CW CALLING CHANNELS (10, .5 KHZ APART)
6281 - 6284.5 SHIP RTTY/CW 8 SITOR-A CHANNELS PAIRED WITH 6327 - 6330.5 ALSO USED FOR CW WORKING FREQS
6285 - 6300 SHIP CW SHIP CW WORKING CHANNELS (.5 KHZ APART)
6300.5 - 6311.5 SHIP SITOR-A 23 NON-PAIRED SHIP TRANSMIT CHANNELS MAY ALSO BE USED FOR CW
6312 - 6313.5 SHIP DSC 4 CHANNELS (.5 KHZ) FOR DSC 6312.0 MAY ALSO BE USED BY COAST STATIONS FOR DISTRESS/SAFETY ONLY
6314 COAST SITOR-B INTERNATIONAL MSI BROADCASTS
6314.5 - 6330.5 COAST SITOR-A 6 MHZ COAST RTTY BAND
6331 - 6332 COAST DSC 3 CHANNELS (.5 KHZ) FOR DSC
6332.5 - 6501 COAST CW 6 MHZ COAST CW BAND
6501 - 6522 COAST USB 6 MHZ COAST USB BAND
8195 - 8288 SHIP USB 8 MHZ SHIP USB BAND PAIRED WITH 8719 - 8812 KHZ
8281.2 BOTH USB LIMITED COASTAL STATIONS - SIMPLEX
8284.4 BOTH USB LIMITED COASTAL STATIONS - SIMPLEX
8291 - 8297 BOTH USB LIMITED COASTAL STATIONS - SIMPLEX
8302 - 8338 SHIP VARIOUS 10 SHIP CHANNELS (4 KHZ) FOR FAX, DATA, AND OTHER SPECIAL TRANSMISSIONS
8340.3 - 8341.5 SHIP DATA 5 SHIP/BUOY CHANNELS FOR DATA TRANSMISSIONS
8342 - 8365.5 SHIP CW SHIP CW WORKING FREQS
8366 - 8370.5 SHIP CW SHIP CALLING FREQS
8371 - 9376 SHIP CW SHIP CW WORKING FREQS
8376.5 BOTH RTTY CH. 801 FOR DISTRESS/SAFETY ONLY (SIMPLEX)
8377 - 8396 SHIP SITOR-A 8 MHZ SHIP RTTY BAND
8396.5 - 8414 SHIP SITOR-A 4 SHIP SITOR-A TRANSMITTING CHANNELS MAY ALSO BE USED FOR CW
8414.5 - 8416 SHIP DSC SHIP DSC - 8414.5 MAY ALSO BE USED BY COAST STATIONS FOR DISTRESS/SAFETY ONLY
8416.5 COAST SITOR-B INTERNATIONAL MSI BROADCASTS
8417 - 8436 COAST SITOR-A 8 MHZ COAST RTTY BAND
8436.5 - 8437.5 COAST DSC COAST DSC
8438 - 8707 COAST CW 8 MHZ COAST CW BAND
8707 - 8716 BOTH USB SIMPLEX OR DUPLEX (CH. 834 - 837) IF DUPLEX, USES 8812
8719 - 8812 COAST USB 8 MHZ COAST USB BAND
12230 - 12350 SHIP USB 12 MHZ SHIP USB FREQS
12290 SHIP USB CALLING/DISTRESS/SAFETY (CH. 1221)
12353 - 12365 BOTH USB 5 SIMPLEX CHANNELS - ALSO USED FOR CROSSBAND
12370 - 12418 SHIP VARIOUS 13 CHANNELS (4 KHZ) FOR FAX, DATA, SPECIAL)
12420.3 - 12421.5 SHIP DATA 5 SHIP/BUOY CHANNELS FOR DATA TRANSMISSIONS
12421 BOTH USB LIMITED COASTAL (SIMPLEX)
12422 - 12476.5 SHIP CW SHIP CW WORKING FREQS
12477 - 12549.5 SHIP SITOR-A 12 MHZ SHIP RTTY BAND
12520 BOTH RTTY SIMPLEX - DISTRESS/SAFETY ONLY
12550 - 12554.5 SHIP CW 10 SHIP CW CALLING CHANNELS
12555 - 12559.5 SHIP SITOR-A DUPLEX WITH 12652 - 12656.6. ALSO CW
12560 - 12576.5 SHIP SITOR-A 34 NON-PAIRED SHIP SITOR TRANSMITTING CHANNELS. ALSO AVAILABLE FOR CW WORKING
12577 - 12578.5 SHIP DSC 4 SHIP DSC CHANNELS. 12577 ALSO MAY BE USED BY COAST STATIONS FOR DISTRESS/SAFETY ONLY
12579 COAST SITOR-B INTERNATIONAL MSI BROADCASTS
12579.5 - 12656.5 COAST SITOR-A 12 MHZ COAST RTTY BAND
12657 -- 12658 COAST DSC 3 COAST DSC CHANNELS
12658.5 - 13077 COAST CW 12 MHZ COAST CW BAND
13077 - 13197 COAST USB 12/13 MHZ COAST USB BAND
16360 - 16525 SHIP USB 16 MHZ SHIP USB DUPLEX BAND
16420 SHIP USB SHIP CALLING/DISTRESS/SAFETY (CH. 1621)
16528 - 16546 BOTH USB 7 SIMPLEX CHANNELS. ALSO CROSS BAND.
16551 - 16615 SHIP VARIOUS 17 CHANNELS (4 KHZ) FOR FAX, DATA, ETC.
16565 - 16592 BOTH USB SIMPLEX - LIMITED COASTAL STATIONS
16617.3 - 16618.5 SHIP DATA 5 SHIP/BUOY CHANNELS FOR DATA
16619 - 16683 SHIP CW 16 MHZ SHIP CW WORKING FREQS
16683.5 - 16733.5 SHIP SITOR-A 16 MHZ SHIP RTTY FREQS
16695 BOTH RTTY SIMPLEX FOR DISTRESS/SAFETY
16734 - 16738.5 SHIP CW SHIP CW CALLING FREQS
16739 - 16784.5 SHIP SITOR-A ADDITIONAL SHIP SITOR-A DUPLEX WORKING FREQS ALSO AVAILABLE FOR SHIP CW WORKING
16785 - 16804 SHIP SITOR-A 39 NON-PAIRED SHIP CHANNELS ALSO AVAILABLE FOR CW WORKING
16804.5 - 16806 SHIP DSC SHIP DSC CHANNELS. 16804.5 ALSO AVAILABLE FOR COAST STATIONS FOR DISTRESS/SAFETY ONLY
16806.5 COAST SITOR-B INTERNATIONAL MSI BROADCASTS
16807 - 16902.5 COAST SITOR-A 16 MHZ COAST RTTY BAND
16903 - 16904 COAST DSC 3 COAST DSC CHANNELS
16904.5 - 17242 COAST CW 16/17 MHZ COAST CW BAND
17242 - 17407 COAST USB 16/17 MHZ COAST USB BAND
18780 - 18822 SHIP USB 15 SHIP USB CHANNELS PAIRED WITH 19755 - 19797
18825 - 18843 SHIP USB 7 SIMPLEX/CROSS-BAND CHANNELS
18848 - 18868 SHIP VARIOUS 6 CHANNELS (4 KHZ) FOR FAX, DATA, ETC.
18870.5 - 18892.5 SHIP SITOR-A SHIP RTTY BAND - DUPLEX WITH 19681 - 19703
18893 - 18898 SHIP SITOR-A 11 NON-PAIRED SHIP TRANSMITTING CHANNELS
18898.5 - 18899.5 SHIP DSC 3 SHIP DSC CHANNELS
19680.5 COAST SITOR-B INTERNATIONAL MSI BROADCASTS
19681 - 19703 COAST RTTY COAST RTTY DUPLEX BAND PAIRED WITH 18870.5 - 18892.5
19703.5 - 19704.5 COAST DSC 3 COAST DSC CHANNELS
19705 - 19755 COAST CW COAST CW STATIONS
19755 - 19797 COAST USB COAST USB DUPLEX, PAIRED WITH 18780 - 18822
22000 - 22156 SHIP USB 22 MHZ SHIP USB FREQS
22098 - 22136 USB BOTH SIMPLEX LIMITED COASTAL STATIONS
22159 - 22177 BOTH USB 7 SIMPLEX/CROSS BAND FREQS
22182 - 22238 SHIP VARIOUS 15 CHANNELS FOR FAX, DATA, ETC.
22240.3 - 22241.5 SHIP DATA 5 SHIP/BUOY DATA FREQS
22242 - 22279 SHIP CW 22 MHZ SHIP CW WORKING FREQS
22279.5 - 22284 SHIP CW 22 MHZ SHIP CW CALLING FREQS
22284.5 - 22351.5 SHIP SITOR-A 22 MHZ SHIP DUPLEX RTTY FREQS
22352 - 22374 SHIP SITOR-A 45 NON-PAIRED SHIP SITOR-A CHANNELS MAY ALSO BE USED FOR CW WORKING
22374.5 - 22375.5 SHIP DSC 3 SHIP DSC CHANNELS
22376.5 - 22443.5 COAST SITOR-A 22 MHZ COAST RTTY FREQS (DUPLEX)
22444 - 22445 COAST DSC 3 COAST DSC CHANNELS
22445.5 - 22696 COAST CW 22 MHZ COAST CW BAND
22696 - 22852 COAST USB 22 MHZ COAST USB DUPLEX

_________________
Cheers - Marty ZL2MC


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What are the marine radio bands on HF?
PostPosted: Mar Fri 08, 2013 12:25 pm 
Member

Joined: Jun Sat 30, 2012 9:26 pm
Posts: 819
Now wouldn't be much easier if the above list plus all the 2mhz frequencies were pre-programed into a radio with the proper emission type and ITU channel number in permanent memory?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What are the marine radio bands on HF?
PostPosted: Mar Fri 08, 2013 7:47 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jun Mon 20, 2011 6:09 pm
Posts: 430
Location: N Cen Mn
OMG(pulling hair out). This is way more complicated than I imagined it would be. My friend seems to think he can get in his boat with a ssb radio and talk to Australia whenever he wants. He definitely needs a ham license, not a sailboat.

_________________
Prediction is difficult, especially about the future. Niels Bohr


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What are the marine radio bands on HF?
PostPosted: Mar Fri 08, 2013 11:52 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 1646
Location: On the Left Coast
"This is way more complicated than I imagined it would be. My friend seems to think he can get in his boat with a ssb radio and talk to Australia whenever he wants. He definitely needs a ham license, not a sailboat."

It's called "reality check".

Education is the key.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What are the marine radio bands on HF?
PostPosted: Mar Sat 09, 2013 3:09 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 5704
Location: Litchfield Minnesota USA
I've been following this thread with some interest.
Somewhere, but I can't find it, I have a list of all marine frequencies, both HF and VHF.
But since I don't know where it is, I guess that's irrelevant.
But a remainder of my long ago boating days is an old SSB marine transciever. I have the radio and the antenna coupler that goes with it.
It is a Eintech Marine 1500.
Typical of those days for smaller vessels, it is rock bound and has about 15 channels, some of them using a multiplier.
But the frequencies listed on it don't match anything shown in the above list.
This radio operates on the former marine AM band, so that might explain it.
The main calling frequency is the only one I can remember, which is 2182 khz.
Others are like 8291.1 SHIP (ship to ship communications) or just a frequency, like 2182 above, or 2638 and 2670. Others are labeled simply "MIAMI" and "SAN JUAN".

My big question is whether these old frequencies are still in marine service, perhaps just for coastal service?
Could this be the SSB the guy with the sailboat is thinking of?
BTW, he doesn't need ham radio instead of a sailboat, he needs ham radio AND a sailboat. From that boat, out at sea, he can contact all sorts of places, maritime mobile.
Mark D.

Mark D.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What are the marine radio bands on HF?
PostPosted: Mar Sat 09, 2013 4:39 am 
Member

Joined: Jun Sat 30, 2012 9:26 pm
Posts: 819
I got into the landmobile and marine business during the early 70's. SSB was looming on the horizon with a sunset date they pushed back IIRC a few times, but they finally pulled the plug I think it was '76. Most of the telcos had 2meg MF ship to shore pairs still in operation on DSB that segement went VHF. SSB was pretty contentious at the time with a lot of mariners really PO'd here in the Miami/FT Lauderdale/Keys area. MF was good enough for most of the voyages between the Bahamian isles and FL for telcom and rescue. Once the SSB changeover occured and in place, the ITU apparently got a wild hair up their tail and decided to change the band plan within a few years. There were virtually new radios installed that had to be recrystalled, retuned, and the tuners retuned that was quite costly for most of the sets and we sure caught a lot of holy hell by proxy. That happend again years later. The original 4 meg allocations were much closer to the lower band edge I remember. The 2 mhz pairs were still there, but shifted too and I don't think they ever got around to officially giving the MF pairs official channel numbers like 4 meg and above even though manufactures and coastal station to some degree standardized on an agreement. Several of the shore stations did have MF pairs listed for watch, but for the most part, that range would be used by pleasurecraft for coastal VHF ship to shore. SSB for the most part remained an albatross and I don't really think it was ready for prime time as a turnkey user medium until a decade later for marine use. Too many factors such as rockbound limitations of 12 channels or less, frequency stability, propagation, good grounding, and the way the medium was marketed and understood by frustrated users. Many shops weren't prepared either with a lot of older techs still not really up to dealing with solid state and PC boards same as Land Mobile. Boaters and yards were reluctant to follow necessary modifications, rigging, and bonding changes to the vessel. Odd times and as
I said, the timing was wrong. SSB was already in use by the mid 60's for commercial users that had cost was no object communications budgets with great results with equipment made by Collins, Scientific Radio, Marconi, Communications Associates, RF/Harris, Mackay, Raytheon, and to some extent RCA, often Mil analogs with type acceptance. Even by '76, designing to an acceptable price point for pleasure craft was difficult. The only company that I recall that had a fully solid state unit ready for that market around that time was the original SGC when Don Stoner was working with Pierre and the awesome tech genius behind the designs. Don was one class act and one of the nicest and accessible folks you could know! Never figured out how that partnership ever worked or came to be. Motorola threw their hat into the ring with solid state, but at too high of a price for most boaters. Their half-sister Communications Associates wouldn't enter that fray for a few years later and again too expensive for most boaters. Konel, later Furuno, Raytheon, Northern, RL Drake, and a several others competed for that market with hybrid units with many limited to 2-4 or 2-7mhz to keep within the price range that was affordable.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What are the marine radio bands on HF?
PostPosted: Mar Sat 09, 2013 9:04 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Mar Mon 17, 2008 5:05 am
Posts: 3847
Location: Palmerston North, New Zealand
IMHO the band around the 2182 distress/calling frequency was called the 'trawler' or 'coastal shipping' band as it had limited range and chiefly used by smaller ships where the radio was on the bridge and could be operated by the Navigation Officers. Any ships that went "Blue Water" required HF long distance radio. That also came with the requirement/disadvantage of a Radio Officer who operated and looked after the radio station and often became the electronics expert who fixed the radar, echo sounder, autopilot, crew TV, video and film projector - oh, and also fixed the crew transistor radios. I was one - back in the 60's.

_________________
Cheers - Marty ZL2MC


Top
 Profile  
 
Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 17 posts ]  Moderator: pixellany

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: 48burl, Adam Vaughn, AuroraOldRadios, Dutch Rabbit, EX COT, John Kusching, Ken G, Mark D, Moontan, TexMac and 11 guests



Search for:
Jump to:  




















Privacy Policy :: Powered by phpBB