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 Post subject: Re: Wierd Tire Problem
PostPosted: Feb Thu 08, 2018 8:12 pm 
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Joined: Sep Fri 14, 2012 12:18 am
Posts: 153
Location: Otis Orchards WA 99027
Cars with all wheel drive systems depend on all four tires having the same circumference for the traction control to work properly and avoid drive train damage. Worn tires are smaller and rotate faster than newer tires. The control system thinks that the faster rotation means the tire is slipping and tries to compensated for it. Regular tire rotation helps keep the tread wear even for all four wheels. Unfortunately, if a tire fails due to a road hazard, you may have to replace all four to keep things balanced.

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 Post subject: Re: Wierd Tire Problem
PostPosted: Feb Fri 09, 2018 12:26 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
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Location: Litchfield Minnesota USA
That's pretty much correct. However the manufacturers are aware that as tires wear and because one tire has to turn faster than another rounding a corner, etc. there has to be some leniency.
In the case of my wife's car, the rear tires are new, the fronts are not new AND are of a different make. I know it's a bit rough on the drive train, but it's the only option at the moment. But there is that leniency and I'm counting on that until we can buy two new front tires. At $250 each, it will be a while.

Mark D.


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 Post subject: Re: Wierd Tire Problem
PostPosted: Feb Fri 09, 2018 6:45 am 
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Joined: Nov Mon 02, 2009 7:01 am
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Location: Lincoln City, OR
Greetings to the Forum:

I agree with the posters who said that with front wheel drive cars, the fronts wear much faster than the rears and that one can just buy replacements for the fronts... and have the rears go on for years.

The drawback to this is that many tires now come with tread wear-out warranties.... and in order to keep these in effect, regular rotation is mandatory. Ask me how I found this out.... or don't. :D

Normally, I do not get the full tread life from tires, so I'd rather keep the warranty in force.... for me, it is cheaper in the long run.

Just my $.02 worth... your mileage may differ... (no pun intended).

Regards,

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 Post subject: Re: Wierd Tire Problem
PostPosted: Feb Fri 09, 2018 4:29 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
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Location: Litchfield Minnesota USA
But unless you bought really crappy tires or your car is way out of alignment the tires with the tread warranty are going to last longer than the warranty. The tire companies aren't stupid, they're going to make sure their car, under normal conditions, are going to outlast the warranty by many miles.
Therefor, I would choose to go on the premise that I will be changing the front tires about halfway through the life cycle of the rears, then either just put new ones on the front (which is what I'd do) or move the half worn out ones to the front and put new on the rear, (which I wouldn't do)

Mark D.


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 Post subject: Re: Wierd Tire Problem
PostPosted: Feb Sat 10, 2018 11:32 am 
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Location: Lincoln City, OR
Greetings to Mark and the Forum:

Au Contraire!

My best time from Lancaster, CA to my work site on top of Mt. Wilson was 58 minutes. Driving a Mazda Miata and cornering hard. The car was well maintained with the alignment (on all four corners) regularly checked.... uneven tire wear due to obvious alignment problems will also void the warranty.

It was through long experience that I found the correct tire pressures for hard cornering with the Miata. Max permissible pressure in the fronts (mostly 35 PSI... only the latest sets of tires would allow 40 PSI and when they did, I would go for it) and 26 PSI (Mazda's recommendation) in the rear. Anything less in the front and the tire would wear noticeably on the tread edges.... and anything more than 26 PSI in the rear would wear out the center of the tread first. Hard to get tire shops to set them up that way; often I had to adjust the pressures once I got the car home.

I bought a number of different brands and types of tires, from cheapies to top-of-the-line. None lasted to within 20,000 miles of the wear-out warranty mileage.

For awhile, I bought Pep Boys bargain tires.... they didn't last too long, so with the warranty, I was getting new tires practically for free. Best wear I got was with Michelins, but even those didn't make it to the end of the warranty period.

My KIA minivan was also hard on tires... mainly the fronts, of course. So, with the prescribed rotation, I usually had ten to fifteen thousand miles left on the warranty with those as well. I used high-end Michelins exclusively on the KIA.

The worst performance I ever got was with Cooper tires. The rule of thumb concerning tire tread compounds is that softer compounds give better adhesion but don't wear well while harder compounds wear better but don't stick well.

Cooper is the only company that I know of who managed to beat this formula. The poor Miata felt like it was driving over marbles in the corners.... it felt really skittish... and was. However, I got the shortest tire life out of those Coopers of all the tires I ever used... even worse than the Pep Boys cheapies.

Anyway, that's why I ended my previous post with "Your mileage may vary."

We shall see how the Yokahoma's I have on my Chevy Suburban do.... but I wouldn't bet that they will make it to the end of the warranty period either.... I drive it like a truck but my wife drives it like a sports car.... hard on tires.

Regards,

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 Post subject: Re: Wierd Tire Problem
PostPosted: Feb Sat 10, 2018 5:41 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 7688
Location: Litchfield Minnesota USA
Well, I don't drive on mountain roads, but I seldom slow down to take a corner or a curve. Front tires on the cars I drive do show rounded corners, so to speak. I know about rubber compounds from back in my stock car racing days. I try to find a tire with a compound that I think might do well on a corner, but will last longer than something really soft. Compromise always.
But still, most of the miles I drive are just long relatively straight asphalt highways. For some reason I'm always driving behind someone or more just when we're reaching a nice double S curve. Yellow (cautionary only) signs say 35 for the speed, yet back about ten years those same signs said 55 with a cautionary yellow. It's easy to take them at 65, over 70 it starts to strain the limits of road holding.
I generally, just for fun of course, turn off a two lane highway onto another two lane highway at the speed I'm driving at on the highway and let the friction of the turn bleed off the speed. It's fun. I don't race anymore because of cost and time limits.
In racing, I used the softest compound I could get. But that caused me to get two nights out of a set of tires. (Short, dirt track's) 1/3 to 1/2 mile ovals. In that sort of racing, you keep the throttle wide open always unless a flag comes down. You scrub off excess speed using braking but keep the engine wide open.
Mark D.


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