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 Post subject: I'm A Musician Too
PostPosted: Jan Tue 23, 2018 5:57 pm 
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Sure, I'm a musician but I'm in a sort of a crisis. I'm very negative towards the modern music industry and how it's developed. A lot of people tell me that's just an age thing but I disagree because I always listen to music that moves me one way or another. It has to be creative. I would rate the late 1960s as probably the most creative era of popular music we ever saw, so it stands to reason I loved the huge bands like The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Beach Boys and many of the fringe, experimental bands (a particular favourite of mine being The Californians).
In the 1970s, although nobody dared admit to it, I have to say Abba's song-writing impressed me. I am also a bit of a John Denver fan.
I also viewed the 1980's a really a very good period. I particularly admired Scritti Politti.

Personally, with regard to the music I make, I was pretty inspired by Lyle Mays. He played synth with the Pat Metheny Group and a fair few Lyle Mays fans have commented on Lyle's signature sound. This is a synthesised ocarina/panflute tone he often used to do leads with the PM Group. I seem to recall he was using a Prophet to do this around 1979.

I have scores of unfinished tracks I simply recorded on an old mobile phone (and once on plain cassette). Lots of these tracks never seemed to get finished although a few are. What was tricky was I never really had any feedback as where I live there is very little interest in learning guitar or keyboard. Whereas in the 1980's we had a fair few bands and I once saw Judie Tzuke perform.

I still enjoy it but the truth is I tend to put music in the last place as somehow I can't really connect with the current environment. I mean, pretty much all the music I listen to (never mind compose) is music most people around would find strange because it comes from a different era. I have definitely noticed though that lots of radio DJs are going back to older music. So often I hear bands like The Police, ELO, Phil Collins, Kate Bush and so on being played.


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 Post subject: Re: I'm A Musician Too
PostPosted: Jan Tue 23, 2018 7:55 pm 
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10.7Megahertz wrote:
Sure, I'm a musician but I'm in a sort of a crisis. I'm very negative towards the modern music industry and how it's developed. A lot of people tell me that's just an age thing but I disagree because I always listen to music that moves me one way or another. It has to be creative. I would rate the late 1960s as probably the most creative era of popular music we ever saw

The "age thing" is probably more accurate than you imagine. I personally would rate the mid '50's as the most creative era of pop music, because the '54-'57 period is when the various genre's -Country and Western, Rhythm and Blues, Group Harmony, instrumentals, Rock and Roll, etc, all melded into the category.

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 Post subject: Re: I'm A Musician Too
PostPosted: Jan Tue 23, 2018 8:16 pm 
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Joined: Nov Mon 05, 2007 11:08 pm
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Location: Calgary Alberta
I agree with fifties. The aging thing is true also .
Dan in Calgary


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 Post subject: Re: I'm A Musician Too
PostPosted: Jan Wed 24, 2018 9:41 am 
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Location: Ft Worth TX
Only thing I can think of that's a lot better now than it was then, can't be spoken outright here. But the big hand and the small hand are really close. You know, 11:58:30. :mrgreen:

Cover band drummer, 65-75. Many influences, and some conspicuously missing (Led Zeppelin, Doors, Neil Diamond, Disco...). Wait, I tell a lie. The band that played Oahu military club circuit DID cover Neil. We had a trombone!

Another Oahu band played warmup for the Doobie Brothers, July 1974.

Wanna start a group? The commute would be a dog, but Neil Young went all the way from Winnipeg to LA and that sure worked.

The 'age thing' most likely an artifact of how grungy it is to like anything your parents do. That Bing Crosley (sic) makes me hurl. OTOH, my first 78 was Dinah Shore's Buttons & Bows. We're talking before cars had fins. (google 58 desoto)

There's music and there's noise. Music starts somewhere and goes somewhere, in some semblance of orderly fashion. We haven't had that spirit here since nineteen sixty nine. And I haven't bought anything "current" since Hotel California. Bleeve the last thing I paid for, was the MPG of Holiday Road by Lindsey Buckingham. Before that, the 45 of Louisiana Man by Rusty & Doug.

So, yeah.


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 Post subject: Re: I'm A Musician Too
PostPosted: Jan Wed 24, 2018 5:44 pm 
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I discovered that music and psychology go together and I'll explain what I mean by that. Please pardon me if (as ever) I tend to go on and on about The Beatles - their fame always fascinated me. Anyway, I'm pretty certain The Beatles never would have become a massive cultural phenomenon without Brian Epstein. Basically the band had to be marketed and had to be "processed" and they needed someone astute enough behind them to know how music works in the social context. In the very early sixties, we're talking clean-cut bands in suits with girl appeal.
From 1963 to 1965, I think The Beatles were forced to stay within the boundaries of the social norms of the time. The fans would be working-class people who liked a catchy, simple tune with a decent beat. Plus, girl appeal. And for the guys the famous mop-top hair cuts.
Here is my punch-line: By 1966, the whole situation changed dramatically. Popular music and a far higher level of popular culture resonated together. People suddenly embraced music as a huge social, political force. It was even connected to the Flower Children movement, psychedelic, peace movements, T.M. and everybody exploring creativity. The Beatles were free to ditch the suits and ties, ditch the "boy loves girl" songs and wear lots of colours, grow beards, experiment with far-out music and just become very inventive. Brian Wilson jumped on the scene with Pet Sounds. The Stones went psychedelic (but failed). Jefferson Airplane and Jimmy Hendrix performed at Woodstock. No doubt about it - music was a huge, massive cultural and social force and everybody was resonating at the same high frequency.
My point about psychology and music is you need various ingredients to produce great music. I think there's the union of cultural movements and music so the musicians become leaders of various trends. Then the fans need to be connected to the whole thing and demanding bigger and better things and new sounds. I think vinyl was a big factor too because you would go out and buy those albums and even pin the covers up on walls. It also allowed The Beach Boys to try and get the upper hand on The Beatles or The Stones to try and beat Sgt Pepper. I figure buying actual vinyl albums was really good for music, plus the chart system.
We do not have this kind of thing today - not even close. Personally, I would rate it as follows:

(1) 1966 - 1969 = an absolute peak of musical creativity in popular culture.

(2) 1971 - 1974 - an almost stagnant period where the big bands had left the stage.

(3) 1975 - 1979 - a far better period with the arrival of disco, funk and punk.

(4) 1980 - 1989 - a great time for the synth and New Wave sound and some pretty decent songwriters still around.


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 Post subject: Re: I'm A Musician Too
PostPosted: Feb Fri 09, 2018 3:12 am 
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Like you, I see the Beatles at the peak, so yeah that would be 1969.
Listen to 'Hey Bulldog' sometime. John pounds out the piano part, Paul picks it up on the bass, creates a rocking bass riff, George does a screaming parody of that riff, and Ringo is flawlessly on the beat as always.
The lyrics didn't need to make any sense at all, because fans created all kinds of meaning to the words.
They were four very creative musicians, and yes, they got some good support from Brian Epstein, who got them some gigs and eased Pete Best out from behind the drums, and of course the genius George Martin.
Anyway, thanks for mentioning the Fab Four. I've never owned a Beatles album, as the radio play was all I ever needed. Kookoo Kachoo!

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 Post subject: Re: I'm A Musician Too
PostPosted: Feb Fri 09, 2018 3:47 am 
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I'll be 76 in April.

Beatles music is fantastically creative... YES.
I grew up in thr 40s,50s so I have all that wonderful big-band and pop music in my blood... and then the early days of rock/doo wop back in 1952 there was a pioneer group called the Five Keys...
.. and they were on the early cusp of doo wop and rock N Roll.
I was right there in the middle of it all ... I went to an early live concert in 1956 where Frankie Lymon & The Teenagers were one of the main acts.

EDIT:
I just found info on-line about that concert from way back in 1956:
"On January 10, 1956, the history of the rock 'n' roll vocal groups and the direction of American music took a new turn and changed the landscape of pop culture forever. Gee Records #1002 was released featuring Frankie Lymon & The Teenagers recording of "Why Do Fools Fall In Love" ...

"In March as "Why Do Fools Fall In Love" heads for the top of the charts, the group appears at New Brunswick High School in New Jersey with dj Danny "Cat Man" Stiles along with The Belvederes and Big Mike Gordon."


ref: http://doo-wop.blogg.org/teenagers-fran ... -c26502532


I remember hearing Earth Angel by the Penguins when it was first hitting the air in 1954 when I was 12.
Then Elvis and all the great early rock'n rollers ... Chuck Berry, Fats Domino ... on and on.
I was buying 45rpms every week of all the new hits from Little Anthony and the Imperials: "tears on my pillow" etc.
All the great girl groups too...
Then early 60s and more great creative stuff until and after the Beatles and after.

But now... I seem to love mostly the 1950s jazz/pop music. American standards.
Tony Bennett, Sarah Vaughn, Ella Fitzgerald, Dinah Washington, Billie Holiday, etc etc.

So I almost don't ever hear anything new anymore (that I care to hear ) on the air but noise. Nothing you can hum to or whistle to the next day... no lyrics you can remember. Just looud boring heavy metal noise or rap junk.

But just recently I have been fortunate to hear a few new things that sound good and have a "hook" and some new twists on older stuff.

Just the other day I heard a song that's been out a while maybe a year... that my ears were "glued" to for some warm fuzzy reason:
"You look Perfect Tonight" ...Ed Sheeran
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Vv-BfVoq4g
I knew it would be on everyones list as their wedding song... it brings tears to my eyes for some reason too. But i'm a romantic old bastard!
Last year:
John Legend " All of me loves all of you"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=450p7goxZqg

and Haley Reinheardt's twist on the old Elvis tune .... Just great !!!!!
"Can't help falling in love with you"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PZeU7S2xKpA

So I have hope that REAL music may come back again.

Al

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To be a man, Be a non-conformist, Nothing's sacred as the integrity of your own mind.
-Emerson


Last edited by Pbpix on Feb Sat 10, 2018 11:11 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: I'm A Musician Too
PostPosted: Feb Fri 09, 2018 5:04 am 
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Location: SoCal, 91387
Pbpix wrote:

But now... I seem to love mostly the 1950s jazz/pop music. American standards.
Tony Bennett, Sarah Vaughn, Ella Fitzgerald, Dinah Washington, Billie Holiday, etc etc.


Right now, I'm listening to "Sentimental Journey" by the Ames Bros & Les Brown, and before that was "What A Difference A Day Makes" By Dinah Washington. Received by my Grace Digital Internet Radio, tuned to Got Radio Forever Fifties, and broadcast throughout the house from my SSTrans. I listen from the time I get up until I retire, except when watching the news or whatever on TV.
IDK if the station is available on a regular PC or not, but they play nothing but pop music that was out from 1950 to 1962.

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 Post subject: Re: I'm A Musician Too
PostPosted: Feb Sat 10, 2018 11:03 pm 
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Location: Haledon, NJ, usa
EDIT:
I'm so surprised ...(anything can be found on the internet) lol
..I just found info on-line about that very early rock concert (I mentioned in my post above)...from way back in 1956:
"On January 10, 1956, the history of the rock 'n' roll vocal groups and the direction of American music took a new turn and changed the landscape of pop culture forever. Gee Records #1002 was released featuring Frankie Lymon & The Teenagers recording of "Why Do Fools Fall In Love" ...

"In March as "Why Do Fools Fall In Love" heads for the top of the charts, the group appears at New Brunswick High School in New Jersey with dj Danny "Cat Man" Stiles along with The Belvederes and Big Mike Gordon."

ref:
http://doo-wop.blogg.org/teenagers-fran ... -c26502532

_________________
To be a man, Be a non-conformist, Nothing's sacred as the integrity of your own mind.
-Emerson


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 Post subject: Re: I'm A Musician Too
PostPosted: Feb Sun 11, 2018 4:00 pm 
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Location: Mountains of Mourne. Ireland.
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ACDC - Whole Lotta Rosie 1977
Watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E1PfIX-GQPk

:) Greg.


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 Post subject: Re: I'm A Musician Too
PostPosted: Mar Thu 29, 2018 9:30 pm 
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Joined: Jun Fri 01, 2012 8:05 am
Posts: 457
Location: North Carolina
Just discovered this thread and must chime in. I too am a musician and have run bands most of my life. I have a 17 piece orchestra with two singers and play the classic "big band" material from the original scores. It is an age thing and people tend to relate to the music they heard when in high school. A great music arranger I know who has done charts for everyone from Tex Beneke to Lady Gaga (He did the duet albums with Tony Bennett) told me that popular music changes almost completely every ten years. It also has a 20 year "nostalgia" cycle. I have found his comments to be generally true and it helps keep it in perspective.

My own take: It has to get better because it cannot get worse... and how many times have we all said that?


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