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PostPosted: Mar Fri 12, 2010 7:42 pm 
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Brian, The 80 tube uses only 2 amps at 5 volts. It is a 5Y3 with a 4-pin base. If you go with diodes, which I don't recommend, the DC voltage will go up to 490 until the tubes warm up, which means you will need 630 volt capacitors for everything. This is not too good for the tube cathodes either. To reduce the voltage so you get 185 on the plates as seen on the schematic, you could remove the first capacitor C26 which will convert this to a choke-input supply. You could put C26 in parallel with C27 instead.
The yellow Illinois Capacitor metallized polyester or metallized polypropylene 630 volts should be fine for all the small capacitors.
What type of fuse is in here? I have a radio with an Edison screw-in fuse, and 1 or 2 amp is not made in that size now. I found a 15 amp in there. You may want to replace the fuseholder with something that holds modern fuses, like you use in a guitar amp. A one amp slow-blow should hold it, as the phono motor is not powered by the fuse.
The aluminum bracket will look nice, and let the transformer be open to the air. Any cover would have to be like a chimney, tall and open on bottom and top so hot air will rise by convection.
Don


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PostPosted: Mar Mon 22, 2010 5:38 am 
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Location: Chapel Hill NC USA 27514
This set is just the broadcast radio, no record changer to deal with.

The amp chassis has a spot where an automotive type tubular glass fuse is used. It actually has three in-line clips for the fuse. One side is marked 110, and the other 120. There is a fuse in the clips on the 110 side, but I have not even looked at it yet to check it's value or condition.

After some consideration, I have decided to just replace the transformer, and leave the rest of the radio as is, other than replacing the 27 tube with the 56 and replacing the caps and out of range resistors.
I have fabricated a replacement box for the transformer, mounted the new transformer inside, along with a large hand made aluminum heat sink, and drilled a few holes in the chassis to allow for more air to get inside the transformer box. The holes will only ever be seen if the chassis is removed from the cabinet. The new trans box is just a three sided faux box to allow for good circulation.

I will closely monitor the temperature of the new transformer once the set is up and running. If need be, I will add a cooling fan under the chassis, or under the cabinet itself. The fans available now are nearly silent, and if properly isolated, will cause zero noise in the system.

The only problem I have at this time, is getting the new trans wired in correctly. This being my first radio trans transplant, and with this being a particularly nice example of a HTF radio, I don't want to make any mistakes, so I am seeking help with it. ;)

Below is the new trans hookup info, and the old trans schematic.

The orange lines are the 120v input line current and the associated switch. I know this is the path that carries current to the transformer, but I wasn't sure if it was important how the black and white input wires on the new transformer were hooked in, polarity wise.

The purple line is just a box that surrounds that area of the schematic, and is not wiring related at all. I just shaded it to make it easier to read the schematic.

The old transformer hookups are the wires numbered 1-12 in the upper right.

Any help here is most appreciated.

http://www.nostalgiaair.org/PagesByMode ... 040308.pdf

Image

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Last edited by dynadude on Mar Mon 22, 2010 9:06 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Mar Mon 22, 2010 6:05 am 
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Better yet, can anyone tell me how to determine how a transformer hooks up? I'd much rather be able to do this for myself anyway, but for now, I would accept some coaching on this unit.

I'm sure it has to do with current demands for each circuit, such as tube filament and plate/grid demands, and I should just put my nose in a book that can give me those numbers, and the associated math. Correct?

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PostPosted: Mar Tue 23, 2010 6:51 am 
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Anyone? :?

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PostPosted: Mar Tue 23, 2010 1:16 pm 
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Location: Livermore, CA
Hi Bryan

Red wires go to pin #2 and #3 on the 80 tube. Red/Yellow goes to ground/chassis.

Yellow wires go to pin #1 and #4 on the 80 .

Orange wires go to pin #1 and #5 on 24's and other tubes. Do not use the green center tap.

Blue wires go to pin #1 and #4 on the 45 tubes. Do not use blue/white wire.

Black and white are for AC input. These connect to your switch and line cord.

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PostPosted: Mar Tue 23, 2010 5:13 pm 
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Thanks Norm,

I was beginning to think I had been abandoned! :shock:

Yep, I'm still pretty green, and situations like this have a way of reminding me.

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PostPosted: Mar Thu 25, 2010 5:45 am 
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Location: Vancouver, Canada
Could someone tell us, what model R-34 is? It happens that I just bought one here in Canada, and find that it is a Canadian version of the 1929 (not 1930!) series of microsynchronous radios, that comprise R-32, RE-45, R-52, and RE-75 (E for Electrola). As far as I can see, the model does not have a US counterpart, being essentially a R-32 (i.e. Lowboy) with doors and a very nice speaker grille woodwork, no turntable. It definitely is not a R-52 (Highboy with doors).
The model R-35 on the other hand, is a model of 1930, including also R-39 and RE-57 (E for Home Recording). The chassis' of the 1930 models differ substantially from those of the 1929 models, by having the tuner and amplifier combined, whereas the R-34, as the R-32 and RE-45, have 3 separate and very collectible parts: tuner, power supply + amplifier, and speaker.
The schematics is here:
http://www.nostalgiaair.org/PagesByModel/693/M0015693.pdf
I had drawn a new schematics and added the Ohmic resistances of all coils of the power supply and amplifier here:
http://www.greenhillsgf.com/Design/Assets/PROJECTS/Images/Radios/Varia/Victor_Tuner_1.jpg
http://www.greenhillsgf.com/Design/Assets/PROJECTS/Images/Radios/Varia/Victor_Tuner_2.jpg
http://www.greenhillsgf.com/Design/Assets/PROJECTS/Images/Radios/Varia/Victor_Amp.jpg

dynadude, you may want to compare your radio with this one, which is a RE-45, and first make sure you have a 1930, and not a 1929 radio:
http://www.greenhillsgf.com/Item_270042331293_mod.htm


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PostPosted: Mar Thu 25, 2010 9:36 pm 
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This is definitely an R-34, but I'm not positive about the year.

No phono, and no doors anywhere. What you see is what there is. ;)

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These are pics from just after I got it home. It's scattered about my house right now, and is about 10 pounds lighter after removing dust, dirt and grime.

It does have the connections for phono, but none of the controls or wiring circuits.

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PostPosted: Mar Thu 25, 2010 9:42 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
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Location: Sandpoint, IDAHO 83864
I think you will need a new 80, as it looks like it has gone to air. And a pair of Zenith 45's in an RCA set? Boy,what is next? :lol:
Curt

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PostPosted: Mar Fri 26, 2010 3:02 am 
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Location: Vancouver, Canada
dynadude, you definitely have a 1930 follow-up model of the series R-35, R-39 and RE-57. But now the dilemma starts. As one can see from the following picture my new (Canadian) Victor is a model R-34 too, but definitely is one of the original 1929 series. The woodwork is unusual and I have never seen it before. The type plate says Rd.1930. So one of the following scenarios must be true:
a. my type plate is taken from another radio (i.e. a 1930 R-34 like yours)
b. Canadian Victor created a R-34, which is different from the US R-34
c. there are transitional models around using old chassis' in new cabinets
I think we need vitanola to tell us.

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