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 Post subject: Oddball "audiodisc" 45 rpm record.
PostPosted: May Sun 16, 2010 2:40 am 
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Joined: Dec Sun 07, 2008 7:05 am
Posts: 4188
Location: MS
While going through a bunch of assorted 45 rpm records at a flea market, I found this "audiodisc" brand record. I have seen these in the form of 78 rpm records and 16" 33 rpm transcriptions; but, never in a 45 rpm format. I know that machines were made during the '30's, '40's, and early '50's for the purpose of cutting your own records at home. The record appears to have an aluminum base with an acetate coating. I played both sides of the record; and, it's some unknown girl group singing "Kansas City" (the Wilbert Harrison song) and "I'm Sorry" (the Brenda Lee song). Since these songs were popular in the very late '50's, I assume that this record is from the same time period. I wonder if this was recorded by a legit group who was trying to "make it" or is this something someone did just to kill time on their Wilcox-Gay "Recordio" machine? I can see that, at one time, there was a typed label on the record; but, there is not enough of it left to determine anything. Any help will be appreciated.

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PostPosted: May Sun 16, 2010 5:29 am 
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Joined: Jan Sat 17, 2009 7:31 am
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Location: USA
FYI, I have only EVER seen these large-hole, 7-inch 45 rpm Audiodisc type records used by PRO or Semi-Pro recording studios.

But, then, where do you draw the line, from "the guy recording people in his basement" and maybe releasing one mass-pressed 45 release on his "label" before quitting?

I'm sure the Audiodisc company would have sold these "45" blank discs to anyone willing to buy them. But by that time, audio TAPE had become the preferred method of home recording. And the majority of home recording machines didn't even have a 45 rpm speed, only the semi-pro and better machines had 45 rpm (save for ONE late Recordio model which was a 3-speed, and very few made apparently, they're quite rare on eBay - I look).

But no, I've never seen anything on these large-hole lacquer 45's that sounded like it wasn't recorded in at least a "semi-pro" studio.

Could have even been done at a local radio station.

Neat find, you ought to post it to YouTube if possible.

- Bob


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PostPosted: May Sun 16, 2010 7:04 am 
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Joined: Dec Sun 07, 2008 7:05 am
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Location: MS
I've owned one Wilcox-Gay "recordio" that was three speed. It was an early '50's "suitcase" model that had a built in AM radio and it used the same tonearm to cut as well as playback.

I didn't even think about this 45 being cut at a radio station. Years ago, I met a lady, whos late husband was a minister back in the '40's and '50's. She had hundreds of 16" transcription records of his sermons and they were all cut at a local radio station. IIRC, the records played from the inside out. She had an old cheap beat up crapafone (oops, I meant califone) transcription player that was past going. I ended up giving her a Garrard 301 TT and a pioneer cassette deck and receiver so she could transfer the records to tape. I'll tell you, that made a 90 something year old little lady very happy. And, that alone was worth more than any money that I might have gotten for the equipment.


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PostPosted: May Sun 16, 2010 1:35 pm 
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Joined: Jan Sun 25, 2009 12:19 am
Posts: 1615
Location: Ohio
radiotvnut wrote:
I've owned one Wilcox-Gay "recordio" that was three speed. It was an early '50's "suitcase" model that had a built in AM radio and it used the same tonearm to cut as well as playback.

I didn't even think about this 45 being cut at a radio station. Years ago, I met a lady, whos late husband was a minister back in the '40's and '50's. She had hundreds of 16" transcription records of his sermons and they were all cut at a local radio station. IIRC, the records played from the inside out. She had an old cheap beat up crapafone (oops, I meant califone) transcription player that was past going. I ended up giving her a Garrard 301 TT and a pioneer cassette deck and receiver so she could transfer the records to tape. I'll tell you, that made a 90 something year old little lady very happy. And, that alone was worth more than any money that I might have gotten for the equipment.


I have several different makes of these 7" blanks. I have a few of these Audiodiscs and a whole bunch of Wilcox Gay 7" blanks. Had them for awhile and can't remember where I got them now. Don't forget, there were thousands and thousands of home recording units available to the public. Anything from the simple Wilcox Gay to Rek-O-Kut to Philco to Presto. Granted, there is still a very good chance your record could have come from an actual studio. I mean it is 60 years old and hard to tell where it's been.
I have never researched any info on Audiodisc, but there were just as many blank record companies as there were producers of such machines.
You can often tell, just by listening to an old disc like this, and get a good idea of where it might have been cut. The fidelity and sound of a Wilcox Gay would rate down at the bottom, compared to a Presto that would rate more toward the top if this disc was cut at home.


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