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 Post subject: How to strip Radio Daze cloth covered wire?
PostPosted: Oct Mon 30, 2006 4:15 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 6759
Location: Minneapolis, MN USA
I'm currently cutting the cloth by hand (Xacto) then use cutters meant for plastic insulation to finish the job (Paladin Stripax).

Any of you know a more efficient means to strip our beloved Radio Daze cloth covered wire?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Oct Mon 30, 2006 6:00 am 
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Joined: Jul Wed 26, 2006 6:25 pm
Posts: 869
Location: Coram, New York 11727
Hi, I just use the regular wire striper. If you have problems with fraying cloth try a little clear nail polish on it before you cut or after.
Unless the stripers are dull they should work fine. PL


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Oct Mon 30, 2006 6:56 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 2623
Location: Perrysburg, OH, U.S.A.
To add a little to what planigan said, I also use a pair of standard wire strippers. This is how I do it:

1. Squeeze the handles until I feel that I've cut through the insulation,

2. Back off enough on the handles to rotate the wire 90 degrees,

3. Squeeze the handles, again just until I feel the insulation (only!) has been cut,

4. Then pull the wire. This should result in clean removal of the cloth insulation.

This is another one of those things that takes a lot longer to describe than to actually do.

John

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“Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity.”
― R. A. Heinlein


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Oct Mon 30, 2006 11:51 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 1944
Location: OOLTEWAH,TN.
I use T STRIPPER # T-6 from WWW.MCMINONE.COM cat. # 28-2700 stripper's need to be replaced they get dull like a knife they work fine for me SMITHY


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Oct Mon 30, 2006 9:09 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 1013
Location: Norton, Massachusetts 02766
I just finished re-wiring two radios using the Radio Daze cloth covered wire. I basically used the exact technique OldWireBender John used. I used a standard pair of wire strippers and like he said, closed down until I felt it cut through, then rotated the wire 90 degrees and closed down again before stripping. I noticed the 20 gauge slot on my wire stripper cut into the wire several times when stripping the insualtion so I had much better success using the 18 gauge slot. It was still tight enough to remove the insulation but by being careful wouldn't nick the wire. I also found the cloth to cut cleanly with just an occassional cloth strand that required trimming.

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Gary


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Oct Mon 30, 2006 11:47 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 6759
Location: Minneapolis, MN USA
Image

Does it work with this style stripper?
Or only the manual, scissors action, slice and tug on the outer jacket kind?

I used this kind for 25+ years for plastic insulation, broke it this summer, haven't replaced it yet. I'm using a fancier tool meant for plastic only and doesn't cut cloth.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Oct Tue 31, 2006 12:04 am 
Silent Key

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 34328
Location: Sandpoint, IDAHO 83864
Dale- that is what I use and it works fine. The set of strippers I have cost nearly fifty bucks over thirty years ago, so that says something about the quality. They were the best there was on the market back in 1975. If the type of wire insulation starts to fray, simply do like others suggested, rotate the wire 90 degrees and have another go at it.
Curt

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Curt, N7AH
(Connoisseur of the cold 807) CW forever!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Oct Tue 31, 2006 12:18 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 6759
Location: Minneapolis, MN USA
Curt:
I too buy a quality tool once, rather than crap, several times.
That's why I'm trying to be crystal clear here.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Oct Tue 31, 2006 1:40 am 
Silent Key

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 34328
Location: Sandpoint, IDAHO 83864
Dale- you reflect my tool buying choices very well! Back in my hot rod days when I was mechanicing on cars, I used to buy those cheap tools and I regret buying every single one of them. Sure, some had a lifetime warranty and if it broke, you took it back and was given a new one. But who wants to spend all their time taking defective tools back? After suffering a really banged up hand when a 5/8" socket split on me under torque, that was enough for me. Even if I only use a certain tool on rare occasions, I will always buy the best quality tool I can. The pain and misery of having your hand bandaged up for a week is my excuse. Some of the el-cheapo tools available should be outlawed, as they are simply too dangerous to apply torque to and when they break, injuries can result.
Curt

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Curt, N7AH
(Connoisseur of the cold 807) CW forever!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Oct Tue 31, 2006 5:54 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 10886
Location: Baltimore, MD, USA
To continue that thought, dad always said, "Work is difficult enough without using inferior tools. Always buy the best".

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Don


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Oct Tue 31, 2006 6:56 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 2623
Location: Perrysburg, OH, U.S.A.
Don,

My dad used to say, "Oh, you can do it with a bad tool, but having a good one makes life a lot easier."

John

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“Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity.”
― R. A. Heinlein


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Oct Tue 31, 2006 8:29 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 9847
Location: Omak,wa,usa
[Hello="Curt Reed"]
I've been using a set of those strippers for years and mine I don't know how old they really are they are made by Ideal I bought new pair last year so now I 3 pairs and one broken spare for parts
sincerely Radio Rich


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Oct Tue 31, 2006 5:11 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 10886
Location: Baltimore, MD, USA
I "borrowed" the set that I have from the army when I was on active duty. That would have been almost 40 years ago. The still work perfectly and I have done absolutely nothing to them other than use them. Funny, the other day I was looking at them and thought that I should clean them. You know, they have dirt accumulated in areas that had oil on it. I probablly should not clean them because, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it!"....

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Don


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