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 Post subject: WEN Solder Gun Tips
PostPosted: Jul Mon 16, 2007 4:43 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 1968
Location: seabeck,wa. usa
Anybody know of a source for new tips for a WEN 450 gun? Kinda gotten used to this dog and would like to keep it in service a little longer. Need the small/ medium tips.
Thanks, Rick


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jul Mon 16, 2007 4:59 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 788
Location: Wisconsin
http://www.wenproducts.com/index.asp?Pa ... Category=3 you may have to contact customer support for your model.

I was given a Wen electric chainsaw and I need to find a chain for it.

Comes in handy for shortening consoles.....just joking. :wink:

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Ron


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jul Mon 16, 2007 6:14 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 1968
Location: seabeck,wa. usa
Thanks Ron, I sent them email, not holding my breath. Is the chain you need an unusual pitch?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jul Tue 17, 2007 8:09 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 788
Location: Wisconsin
Hi Rick,

I don't know anything about chainsaws and this one was given to me from an estate. I thought it did not cut like it should even though I know it is a small electric type and not a large gas powered model.

From the looks of the website, it seems Wen does not have an extensive list of replacement parts. I did not see your model soldering gun listed nor did I see any chainsaws.

I am a fairly big guy and not too far over the hill, so last fall I got out the axe and did the job the old fashioned way. There were only about 3 or 4 logs that were tougher than me and too big for my fireplace so I got out the chainsaw and had a good laugh when the wood started to smoke and the chains left only a scratch.

Let us know how the Wen customer service turns out. I think there were others here that mentioned owning Wen products.

If it is any help I found a pair of light duty Wen 450 tips listed on Ebay when I typed in "Wen 450 soldering gun tips". I do not think posting a link to an Ebay auction is allowed here so I will PM you the link if you want me to. The part number for light duty tips for your model is Wen part # 45F7V according to the seller on Ebay

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Ron


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jul Tue 17, 2007 9:01 am 
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Joined: Mar Sun 25, 2007 6:27 pm
Posts: 1263
Location: Little Rock, Arkansas
I'm not sure about the 450, but that Wen 100T looks exactly like my Archer 100 watt gun.

You might be able to use Archer tips from Radio Shack.

Not sure, but worth a try.

Raven


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jul Tue 17, 2007 9:02 am 
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Location: USA
There's modern "clones." Try Harbor Freight or Northern Hydraulics, maybe Mat Electronics.

I think they're just copper, nothing fancy. Maybe something a bit harder than copper, but not by much. The only way a specific model might matter is to fit a specific size or method of attachment. Really, they're just fancy bits of heavy wire. I've made tips from scraps of copper house wiring. Bend it to roughly the same shape and crimp the end. Lightly hammer the "tip" and shape it with a file or stone to a more pointed shape. You could get some square stock from a hobby store and make some pretty convincing replacements.

I've also bought tips for just any ol' iron and rebent them to match the iron I was trying to fit.

For pencil irons, I've used screws that I ground the heads to shape and just threaded them into the shaft with a pliers.

The "real thing" might be better, but we all have these substitute tips just laying around.

-Ed


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jul Tue 17, 2007 2:03 pm 
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Location: Chesapeake VA
milkman64 wrote:
I got out the chainsaw and had a good laugh when the wood started to smoke and the chains left only a scratch.



Dull chain... If you know how, 5 min with a file will fix it...


Rickd

I have a few pieces of old Wen stuff, Ill check my goodies...


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jul Tue 17, 2007 3:42 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 1968
Location: seabeck,wa. usa
Thanks again guys. The tips needed are a little different.
Image
There are three sizes, the ones shown are the "too big" and the "too small", the "just rights" are burnt out. The cylinders actually contain the heating element with a copper tip. With a couple of sleeves of O2 sensor lead insulation, you can poke down into a nest of wires and only ruin about half of them while doing a solder joint. :lol:
As for chainsaws, came to the conclusion years ago that electric saws are often easier to start but harder to cut with. Be careful with those dull chains, might start a fire :lol:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jul Tue 17, 2007 3:49 pm 
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Location: Chesapeake VA
Mine are the wire type for Model #199 Sorry...

ebay has these... But I think they are the small ones...

http://cgi.ebay.com/2-Soldering-Tips-Fo ... dZViewItem


Tom


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jul Tue 17, 2007 4:00 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 1968
Location: seabeck,wa. usa
Thanks anyway, can always fall back on the oxyacetylene torch, that'll learn 'em. :lol:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jul Tue 17, 2007 4:58 pm 
Silent Key

Joined: Jan Tue 16, 2007 11:48 pm
Posts: 9664
Location: Hueytown, AL
Milkman64; As has been suggested, a chainsaw without a sharp chain is about the most useless piece of power equipment around. Find a round file that matches the radius of the teeth, 3/16" is common for small saws. Also need a flat file for the "depth gage", that chain projection that is just ahead of the cutting end of each tooth. This determines how much "bite" the tooth takes. This needs doing only as the tooth is filed back to keep the top of the tooth slightly higher than the projection. There are specs and gages for this also. Find someone that knows how to sharpen and take a quick lesson. The guy at the hardware may or may NOT know how. Be careful and don't cut any dirt! Almost instant dull! And use a LOT of common sense. A chainsaw can cut you SEVERELY in a heartbeat! Even an electric one!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jul Wed 18, 2007 2:36 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 569
If it's just the tip, you can rebuild it with stick brazing rod, then grind the profile you want.

Remove it from the element first. :wink:

Anti sieze on the threads is nice too 8)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jul Wed 18, 2007 3:49 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 2267
Location: Massachusetts
The Wen solder tips have always been hard to find. I remember my dad when I was a kid in the 70's trying to find replacements for his solder gun, think he had to order them directly from Wen.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jul Wed 18, 2007 4:46 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 1968
Location: seabeck,wa. usa
WEN says they have only the light duty tips available. Oh well, both these guns were about $2.00 each, with tips, (yard sales). Guess I'll have to keep lookin'.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jul Wed 18, 2007 4:55 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 10746
Location: Valley City ND USA
I talked to a nice person on the phone via the wen 800 number. One shipping fee no matter how many tips wanted . My gun is probably near 50 years old. No problems. Just call and ask! Don't make things harder than they are. Good quick service.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jul Wed 18, 2007 7:32 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 788
Location: Wisconsin
I always thought a tip was a tip. I wonder what the difference is between light duty and heavy duty. In either tip, the temperature would be the same. Perhaps "light duty" is the polite way to say made cheaper. If they make a light duty tip one would assume there has to be a heavy duty tip. Maybe the light duty is smaller for more precise work.

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Ron


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jul Wed 18, 2007 4:15 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 1968
Location: seabeck,wa. usa
This is what's inside the "medium duty" tip. A barrel with a ceramic lining, heating element and a copper tip. The heating element connection to the tip has burned off. When assembled, the tip is silver soldered/silver brazed into the barrel. When installed into the gun's frame, screws connect to the barrel and the larger wire end of the element. Best I can determine, the heating elements are different for the three tip sizes, based on heat-up time.
Image


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