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 Post subject: electrola
PostPosted: Apr Wed 30, 2008 5:44 pm 
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Joined: Feb Wed 21, 2007 10:05 pm
Posts: 1226
Location: b4e3p4, halifax, ns
can anyone tell me anything about this:

used on re-45
Image

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Apr Wed 30, 2008 7:33 pm 
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Joined: Jan Tue 22, 2008 8:59 pm
Posts: 289
Location: Niskayuna, NY
That is a wonderfully interesting machine. The pickup is magnetic, it uses a horseshoe magnet and a coil, with a needle holder for a steel needle. You're going to have to replace the rubber in the pickup before it will sound good. Careful not to damage the hair-fine wire when rebuilding the pickup. It uses steel needles just like a wind-up machine, and you should only play acoustic and early electric era records (like VE Victor Electric) on the thing, since it tracks pretty heavy with the steel needle. Properly rebuilt, the thing will sound amazing, you barely hear the surface noise of the record, and the thing will get plenty loud. Just like a windup, one play per needle.

Depending on the model, there is an automatic shutoff switch that detects the end of record eccentric groove and shuts down the motor (early 30's models only, I think). Turntable speed adjustment is done by a recessed flat head screw in the motorboard. The motor on this machine is very large, and rather "open" looking. Very reliable, and easy to de-gunk. A friend and I once found one of these that had been living outside for a LONG time, cabinet was nearly rotted away. After some cleaning and a little oiling, the motor worked fine.

This is a very early electric phonograph - but it still sounds really nice!

-Ian


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: May Thu 01, 2008 6:06 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 23
Location: Tampa FL USA
That pic is my re-45, I bought a rebuilt pickup on ebay, recapped the amp and it sounds great even with worn records. I have found that Victor, Columbias, Okeh's and Brunswick records sound the best(all recorded with the Western Electric cutter head). The stylus pressure is very heavy so I don't play any of my valuable records on it, but its perfect for the Whiteman's, Rudy Vallee's and such.
Highly recommended if you want a late 20's electric phono, heck the tuner section TRF is probably the best I've seen for this era.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: May Fri 02, 2008 4:53 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 5072
Location: Ortonville, Michigan
The above posts say it all, pretty well. The Victor automatic brake was first used on the Orthophonic phonographs, and the electrolas from 1925 on. Victor was the first to use the eccentric trip groove in 1923, and their automatic brakes worked beautifully with them.

One thing that works to your advantage is the use of the later Vicor Inertia type pickup arm in place of the straight Victor arm. It's counterweighted, and LOTS easier in records. You use the same pickup head, simply transferred to the inertia arm. I did it on one of my RE-45s, and plan to use one on my RE-75.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: May Fri 02, 2008 9:07 pm 
New Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 23
Location: Tampa FL USA
Inertia Arm? Is that the one "flared" out near the pick up head? Somewhat art deco looking with "V" in the middle?
Thanks


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: May Sat 03, 2008 11:48 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 5072
Location: Ortonville, Michigan
Yes, it is. There is a counterwright in the rear of the arm, and a smaller wieight in the end of the flare-outs. It provides that the arm has more mass than the straight one, and that bass modulation from the record doesn't affect the arm.

In the straight arm, the whole arm was vibrated by low frequency passages in the record. It had little inetia, and the result was a loss in bass output.

This can't really be regarded as an example of an art deco design, even if everything on eBay is called art deco. (and rare, also!)


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