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 Post subject: Manhattan construction
PostPosted: Mar Wed 25, 2020 9:33 pm 
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Joined: Feb Thu 19, 2015 1:49 pm
Posts: 80
I'm planning a build using manhattan construction,I ordered a few copper clad boards.My question is what is the best way to cut them? I will use one of the boards to make the little islands for soldering components to so I just want to cut them nice and neat,what is the best tool? These are one sided boards .


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 Post subject: Re: Manhattan construction
PostPosted: Mar Wed 25, 2020 9:59 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 1490
Location: Wayside, NJ Monmouth
I picked up and old Shear style Paper cutter at the thrift store to cut Copper clad board. You will need to clamp down the board to get straight cuts. But it's the easiest method I found, other then a sheet metal shear.


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 Post subject: Re: Manhattan construction
PostPosted: Mar Wed 25, 2020 10:39 pm 
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Joined: Jun Sun 15, 2014 5:37 pm
Posts: 624
Location: Montreal, Quebec
I've always used tin snips,though for longer pieces I can get sloppy. And the cheap board that I can't remember the name of (and I've not seen it in decades) will shatter when cut with tin snios.

I've seen the suggestion, I think, of scoring the board and then holding it against a sharp surface. I can't remember if I've tried that, and that doesn't work for small pieces, nothing to leverage.

Do you really need pads?

Certainly for breadboarding, you can just use circuit board for ground, and everything else just floats above it. You generally have enough components to ground to hold it all up. It's easy to change things. Long ago there was the suggestion that if you needed support where you didn't need ground, you could use a very large value resistor. Small value capacitors would likely work too if the frequency was low enough.

Or a fusion, pads at a few places rather than everywhere.

It can look messy, but keep it inside a box and nobody would know. And for compactness, you have to keep the components at an angle.

Bill Hoisington, K1CLL, wrote endlessly in "73" , into the eighties. Rarely photos, but lots of drawings. He did a lot with copper circuit board, some of it maybe "Manhattan style" but before the name.


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 Post subject: Re: Manhattan construction
PostPosted: Mar Wed 25, 2020 11:04 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 1490
Location: Wayside, NJ Monmouth
Using pads( Manhattan style) glued to a copper ground plane works. but the glue can become undone by heat. Using the ground plane without any pads and correcting components in the air is know a Dead Bug Style. You could take a hacksaw and cut through the copper in a cross hatch pattern. One method I have used is to use a Blair Cutter, which is used to cut out spot welds in the auto repair shops. It leaves a small circle that you can solder to and still keep a large ground plane. Nice this about it is you can place the isolated pads where you need them. Proto typing this way is fun and quick to see if a circuit will work, before investing time in a build.


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 Post subject: Re: Manhattan construction
PostPosted: Mar Wed 25, 2020 11:29 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 4135
N2LXM wrote:
Using pads( Manhattan style) glued to a copper ground plane works. but the glue can become undone by heat. Using the ground plane without any pads and correcting components in the air is know a Dead Bug Style. You could take a hacksaw and cut through the copper in a cross hatch pattern. One method I have used is to use a Blair Cutter, which is used to cut out spot welds in the auto repair shops. It leaves a small circle that you can solder to and still keep a large ground plane. Nice this about it is you can place the isolated pads where you need them. Proto typing this way is fun and quick to see if a circuit will work, before investing time in a build.

A small Forstner bit will make the islands, too, directly onto the PCB material without you having to cut islands separately. Before I used the Forster, I used a brad point bit. Both of these leave a hole in the island, but the are easily positioned.

For the Manhattan method, I make the islands out of some thin flexible PDB material and use a standard hand punch made for three right binders.


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 Post subject: Re: Manhattan construction
PostPosted: Mar Thu 26, 2020 2:14 am 
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Joined: May Tue 30, 2006 4:46 pm
Posts: 10186
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Harbor Freight used to sell a cheap sheet metal hole punch. Not sure it is still available.

Works well for Manhattan pads.

https://www.toolplanet.com/product/stee ... 6QQAvD_BwE

Rich


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 Post subject: Re: Manhattan construction
PostPosted: Mar Thu 26, 2020 5:02 am 
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Joined: Aug Thu 20, 2015 3:09 pm
Posts: 1439
Location: Albion, CA, USA, 95410
There was someone on the web selling pads and IC pads and whatnot. I can't seem to find them now. I got a great variety pack from them but can't seem to find them with a quick search. You may be able to if you try harder than I did. They are great, pre-tinned and very handy.

EDIT: Here are some from Far Circuits. I don't think it is where I got mine:

https://www.farcircuits.net/manhatten_pads_list.htm


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 Post subject: Re: Manhattan construction
PostPosted: Mar Thu 26, 2020 5:46 am 
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Joined: Jun Sun 15, 2014 5:37 pm
Posts: 624
Location: Montreal, Quebec
I've used a Dremel tool with a carving bit to iaolate some points on an otherwise complete piece of circuit board.

In the seventies someone showed how to make a tool to make isolated pads in circuit boards, but it sure seemed like you needed machine tools to make it. And I can't remember the sequence, but either the article caused someone to offer such a tool commercially, or it existed first and caused the how-to article.


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 Post subject: Re: Manhattan construction
PostPosted: Mar Thu 26, 2020 4:47 pm 
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Joined: May Tue 30, 2006 4:46 pm
Posts: 10186
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
I've been doing Manhattan for 20 years; not much since the Fire of 2017, however.

There is a pad cutting tool you can buy or make: http://www.njqrp.club/islanderpadcutter ... Manual.pdf

The sheet metal punch is really the easiest in my opinion:

Image

A Dremel tool works, but not very neatly.

I have also used a spot weld cutter: https://www.harborfreight.com/38-in-dou ... zoEALw_wcB

If you are working with RF or high impedance analog circuits, be sure you thoroughly clean all the copper dust from the grooves you cut. Amazing what a little copper dust will do to increase leakage paths!

If you don't have access to a shear, scribing and breaking gives the neatest cuts. I use a plastic cutting scribe tool from TAP Plastics.


Image

Rich

PS: you can use "super glue" to attach the pads to the copper board. Don't use much heat, though. Pre-tin your pads before gluing them to the board. Epoxy works also, but slower and you have to mix A/B components.


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 Post subject: Re: Manhattan construction
PostPosted: Mar Thu 26, 2020 9:35 pm 
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Joined: Aug Wed 04, 2010 5:40 pm
Posts: 448
Location: Tyngsborough, Massachusetts
I've used a 3/8 inch diamond glass/ceramic drill bit in a drill press to cut islands on a circuit board. The resulting pad is about 1/4 inch in diameter, with a groove about 1/16 inch wide around it.

I got mine a Lowes, but here's a link to one on Amazon. https://www.amazon.com/Lenox-Tools-1210 ... B002QMNALQ

Jeff


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 Post subject: Re: Manhattan construction
PostPosted: Aug Fri 14, 2020 9:53 pm 
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Joined: Aug Fri 14, 2020 6:27 pm
Posts: 2
Hiya

I have bought both small and large pads for manhatten construction from qrpme
Apologies for not giving full address as I am limited as a new member but it ends in com.

They are pre-scored and timmed and are easy to use.
He also has ic pads.

No connection, just a happy customer.

Cheers

Steve


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 Post subject: Re: Manhattan construction
PostPosted: Aug Sat 15, 2020 2:20 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 2394
Location: Saskatoon
https://www.mcmaster.com/spot-weld-cutters/


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 Post subject: Re: Manhattan construction
PostPosted: Aug Sat 15, 2020 9:52 pm 
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Joined: May Tue 30, 2006 4:46 pm
Posts: 10186
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
You can also get a spot weld cutter hole saw from Harbor Freight. Only one size. The punch sets come with a variety of punch sizes.

No longer at Harbor Freight but Home Depot has a complete set.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Capri-Tools ... lsrc=aw.ds

Image

Rich


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 Post subject: Re: Manhattan construction
PostPosted: Aug Thu 20, 2020 7:17 pm 
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Joined: Aug Wed 25, 2010 3:23 pm
Posts: 1405
Location: WA 98407
What Dilton said! The meSquares pads are the way to go -- I love 'em. The website is kind of clunky but worth a visit: http://www.qrpme.com/.

Tom

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 Post subject: Re: Manhattan construction
PostPosted: Aug Thu 20, 2020 8:54 pm 
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Joined: May Tue 30, 2006 4:46 pm
Posts: 10186
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
FAR Circuits has some Manhattan boards.

http://www.farcircuits.net/icpads.pdf

Rich


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