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 Post subject: Re: Most difficult time consuming auto repair you've done?
PostPosted: Sep Mon 20, 2021 5:53 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
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Location: Detroit, Michigan
I've had jobs that took longer, but worst was replacing the heater core on my '92 Dodge Shadow. Had to have the AC discharged, disconnect that, remove the dash, to get at the box that contained both the heater core and the AC evaporator. Replace heater core, put everything back together, have AC recharged. Had to have my brother over to help get the dash back in place. Ridiculous design, apparently designed for ease of manufacturing assembly. Took me about two weeks end to end. Totally miserable experience.

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 Post subject: Re: Most difficult time consuming auto repair you've done?
PostPosted: Sep Mon 20, 2021 6:51 pm 
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Reminds me of the ol “jack the engine off its mounts to replace spark plugs” design

If the designers were required to work on the vehicles they designed, I’m guessing things would be more serviceable

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 Post subject: Re: Most difficult time consuming auto repair you've done?
PostPosted: Sep Mon 20, 2021 7:05 pm 
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Location: New Castle, IN
Barry H Bennett wrote:
Reminds me of the ol “jack the engine off its mounts to replace spark plugs” design

If the designers were required to work on the vehicles they designed, I’m guessing things would be more serviceable


It wasn't spark plugs, but I had to do that to my mom's old mid-90's Buick to replace the water pump. It wouldn't have been bad if I were still in high school and had access to the auto shop. At it was, I was in my uncle's driveway instead...


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 Post subject: Re: Most difficult time consuming auto repair you've done?
PostPosted: Sep Mon 20, 2021 7:36 pm 
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westcoastjohn wrote:
Right, you had your basic set of wrenches with you but a little folding chair would have been handy. And some paper towels. Lucky they didn't hassle you for blocking the fire lane. Nice ride you got there.

That day in Wolf Point, Montana, we sat there in the park and had lunch, gas dripping into a pan, while I read the Haynes VW Repair manual one more time, couldn't believe it. That engine with the goofy fuel pump was a 1700 cc I think only used for a year or so, but as luck would have it, it was our transportation home.
We were down but not out, so on a full stomach, I had the inspiration. Went back to the Ford, Chev or Dodge parts store and bought a little electric fuel pump. About an hour later, with wire and plumbing strap from the junk box, we were back on the road and had a fairly trouble free trip home.

Sold the van a couple of months later with that little electric pump still wired to the ignition coil, so long and good luck with it. :D


Thank You... Figured since I was working around gasoline, car should be in FIRE lane. :wink: Luckily it was sunday aft 5, store closed, maybe a half dozen cars rode through the parking lot. I'd packed a emergency parts box & was going to take a carb(useable one on shelf), seller said it was new.

For carbed vehicles a electric fuel pumps can be a life saver, good to have one handy.

Fairlane at cruise in, VA Beach, time to head home. Couple days later we went to Hertford NC for lunch(home of Jim "Catfish" Hunter), turned up 46K mi on way home. I have paperwork for car back to original window sticker & bill of sale. Before owner in OH bought it, had lived it's life in GA.

BTW heater cores on most vehicles with AC is a horrid job, the heater/AC plenum, is installed before any other interior components.


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 Post subject: Re: Most difficult time consuming auto repair you've done?
PostPosted: Sep Mon 20, 2021 7:54 pm 
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Location: Detroit, MI USA
Agree that heater cores on most newer vehicles are a nightmare, but the pro mechanics that work on them often develop short cuts that save hours of time. Case in point, a 90 Crown Victoria also requires removing the dashboard to get the evaporator housing out to access the heater core. However, after talking to one local independent shop I learned that you can remove all the hardware and disconnect a few wires that are too short, and simply pull out the right end of the dash and wedge a 4 x 4 in the right spot to support it, and do the repair in a few hours time.

A totally different experience from my '57 Ford with factory air in dash (not the sort that hangs under the dash) that I did last week. I noticed a slight drip of coolant and based upon where it was dripping on the driveway knew it was coming from the heater core from under the dash. Luckily I did not have the AC charged, so it was a simple matter to remove the blower housing under the hood and then the evaporator housing with heater core from the dashboard side of the firewall. Nothing else interferes with it, there's enough clearance to get the whole thing out quite easily. Took less than an hour to accomplish that and verify the core is leaking. I put it back together with the heater core bypassed while I look for a replacement, but it's specific to the AC system so I might eventually need to get the old one recored.

Attachment:
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 Post subject: Re: Most difficult time consuming auto repair you've done?
PostPosted: Sep Mon 20, 2021 8:43 pm 
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Joined: Aug Tue 24, 2021 9:18 pm
Posts: 215
35Z5 wrote:
Anyone (tried to)rebuild a carb in a parking lot??

No, but I rebuilt the one out of my Dodge pickup on the concrete pad at the bottom of my front steps. Twice, actually. :?

It worked great the first time until one day when I left the house and started up the first steep hill, it fell on it's face like the fuel pump quit. I drifted it back to the house and replaced it, and no real change. I pulled the carb back off, opened it up, and it was full of what looked like mouse crap. Turns out, for some reason, it somehow managed to suck a bunch of the charcoal out of the charcoal canister into the float bowl. :roll: I have no idea how. There were only a few vacuum lines, and they were hooked up just as the diagram under the hood said they should be. I left the stupid canister unhooked the second time.


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 Post subject: Re: Most difficult time consuming auto repair you've done?
PostPosted: Sep Mon 20, 2021 10:16 pm 
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Location: SW, MI
Barry H Bennett wrote:
ttx450cap wrote:
Barry H Bennett wrote:
"repair" being a repair, not a rebuilding job or collision damage or engine swap ...

Not sure how you came up with that, sounds like an nominal fallacy. I take it you want to argue. When you repair, fix, replace, rebuild, restore, upgrade, it is most often to fix a problem, it will need to be removed, repaired, rebuild, upgraded. Shewww...

ummm... WHAT???? lmao... YOU are the one arguing. How about you stay out of it if you have nothing important to add.

your gerbish is important .. lol maybe if you knew what you are talking about. You would be ahead if you took your own advice.

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 Post subject: Re: Most difficult time consuming auto repair you've done?
PostPosted: Sep Mon 20, 2021 10:19 pm 
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Location: SW, MI
I seen heater core replacement jobs pay 6hrs from the book. Those usually require tearing out the whole dashboard. Not fun.

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 Post subject: Re: Most difficult time consuming auto repair you've done?
PostPosted: Sep Mon 20, 2021 10:34 pm 
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Location: 44035 (Near Cleveland Ohio)
Barry - - it was stated that your "gerbish" is important. I wonder if mine is too . . . . 8) Nothing worse than unimportant "gerbish". Methinks someone has too much starch in his underdrawers . . . :lol:

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 Post subject: Re: Most difficult time consuming auto repair you've done?
PostPosted: Sep Mon 20, 2021 11:08 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 10802
Location: 13 Critchley Avenue, PO Box 36, Monteith Ont, P0K 1P0
Mr. Detrola wrote:
A totally different experience from my '57 Ford

Whoaaa ... ! that was a flashback and a half for me. My dad had a 1957 Meteor Niagara. The lines, lights, are almost identical to your car.

Nice car BTW !!


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 Post subject: Re: Most difficult time consuming auto repair you've done?
PostPosted: Sep Mon 20, 2021 11:49 pm 
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Joined: Jun Sat 15, 2019 7:43 pm
Posts: 1469
Looks like a dressed up Ford
Attachment:
meteor300.jpg
meteor300.jpg [ 666.32 KiB | Viewed 319 times ]


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 Post subject: Re: Most difficult time consuming auto repair you've done?
PostPosted: Sep Tue 21, 2021 12:04 am 
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Joined: Sep Mon 05, 2011 1:42 pm
Posts: 1032
Location: Philadelphia, PA
I'm not a mechanic and only have a limited set of tools so replacing a half-axle on a Dodge minivan, while successful, was very stressful and left me a greasy mess.

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 Post subject: Re: Most difficult time consuming auto repair you've done?
PostPosted: Sep Tue 21, 2021 12:08 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 27847
Location: Detroit, MI USA
John Bartley wrote:
Mr. Detrola wrote:
A totally different experience from my '57 Ford

Whoaaa ... ! that was a flashback and a half for me. My dad had a 1957 Meteor Niagara. The lines, lights, are almost identical to your car.

Nice car BTW !!



Thanks, John, I've had it since 1977. It's an original survivor from Oklahoma and unrestored, other than repairing a few necessary safety items like redoing the entire braking system a couple years back. The paint is nearly all original, shows it's age up close, but I am choosing not to redo it, although I may eventually touch up a few spots.

The Canadian Meteor that year was built on a Ford body, obviously, but with a different grille. I had a nearly identical '57 Ford to the one I own now way back in the mid 60's and living on the border had been to Canada and seen the Meteors many times as a kid. I gave some serious thought to getting a grille out of a Meteor from a junkyard to customize mine, but never did. A few other local owners at that time did swap some Canadian parts onto their cars to give them a different look.

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 Post subject: Re: Most difficult time consuming auto repair you've done?
PostPosted: Sep Tue 21, 2021 12:42 am 
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Quote:
your gerbish is important .. lol maybe if you knew what you are talking about. You would be ahead if you took your own advice

Gerbish is .... actually gibberish, if I am interpreting what your limited vocabulary is trying to say. Gibberish is apparently something you know a great deal about, since you insist on spouting it repeatedly.

In addition, perhaps you need a spelling course, or an english course, or more appropriately, a course on how to get along with people. Go sleep it off already. I'm done with you, but please, keep showing the rest of the forum how immature you really are.

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 Post subject: Re: Most difficult time consuming auto repair you've done?
PostPosted: Sep Tue 21, 2021 12:52 am 
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Location: 44035 (Near Cleveland Ohio)
devilsmist wrote:
Looks like a dressed up Ford
Attachment:
meteor300.jpg


DM


Beautiful blast from the past! Keeping it original is part of it's heritage, which you're a caretaker of. Great job in preserving an art form. Thanks very much for sharing. Too many great cars have been chopped/channeled and robbed of their original roots. I've gone to too many car shows where a 1947 Buick sedan (for example) now has a 454 V8, turbohydro 400, power windows, remote door latches, air conditioning, and mag wheels. It's like cutting out the Mona Lisa and gluing it on to a black velvet background with blacklight highlights . . . . :lol: :lol: But each to his own, I guess. I'm glad there are still folks who preserve stuff just for the sake of it.

Dan


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 Post subject: Re: Most difficult time consuming auto repair you've done?
PostPosted: Sep Tue 21, 2021 2:14 am 
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Joined: Jan Mon 18, 2010 2:13 am
Posts: 22681
Location: Dayton Ohio
when I was 21, I picked up a 1973 Volkswagen Bus which had the very rare fully automatic transmission installed. It used the joint VW/Porsche 1700 CC engine which I believe was used in the Porsche 914.

It was missing the muffler, so driving it home I didn't notice the noises coming from the transmission. once it was muffled, it was a noisy mess. Turns out the differential compartment lost its gear oil and the pinion and ring gear were totally worn out!

As that transmission was unobtanium both complete or parts availability, I searched out a junker bus to get the transmission, shifter and clutch pedal and associated components. Then spent the first part of the summer converting it from Automatic to Standard shift. I also replaced the dual carb setup with a Weber two barrel progressive carb kit.

It was a success and drove it to ARCI Radiofest 1988 and then to the AWA Conference in Canandaigua the same year. The last radio trip was to the IHRS meet in Fort Wayne in the Spring of 1989. Late summer of that year, the engine developed an oil leak which only happened when running and dumped oil onto the exhaust manifold causing a huge amount of smoke. I worried if it caught fire, the fuel tank was directly above and could become a serious problem. I parked it and later sold it.

Except for that oil issue, it was a sweet running van! I was getting 28 MPG consistently! sadly it had zero heat and once driving it in an ice storm I had to stop and scrape the ice off every few miles.

It was a fun project nonetheless :D

-Steve

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 Post subject: Re: Most difficult time consuming auto repair you've done?
PostPosted: Sep Tue 21, 2021 2:22 am 
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Joined: Aug Tue 24, 2021 9:18 pm
Posts: 215
SparkyDan wrote:
devilsmist wrote:
Looks like a dressed up Ford
Attachment:
meteor300.jpg


DM


Beautiful blast from the past! Keeping it original is part of it's heritage, which you're a caretaker of. Great job in preserving an art form. Thanks very much for sharing. Too many great cars have been chopped/channeled and robbed of their original roots. I've gone to too many car shows where a 1947 Buick sedan (for example) now has a 454 V8, turbohydro 400, power windows, remote door latches, air conditioning, and mag wheels. It's like cutting out the Mona Lisa and gluing it on to a black velvet background with blacklight highlights . . . . :lol: :lol: But each to his own, I guess. I'm glad there are still folks who preserve stuff just for the sake of it.

Dan

I agree. It bothers me to see a classic chopped / channeled and otherwise hacked up to where it barely resembles how it originally was. Engine swaps, wheels, and things that are done just to make them more reliable etc don't bother me as much as long as they are tastefully done. Though, I can understand taking an old vehicle that was a basket case that parts are pretty much nonexistent for and customizing it to your liking. Survivors should be kept original, if possible. Just my opinion.


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 Post subject: Re: Most difficult time consuming auto repair you've done?
PostPosted: Sep Tue 21, 2021 2:18 pm 
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One of the Canadian "picker" guys recently bought a '61 Meteor, for a 60 year old car, it's all but perfect. Styling somewhat different with unique tail light treatment, grille isn't exactly warmed over Ford either. I remember seeing a few in '64 when I was in Canada.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KGlEvvMMFg4

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 Post subject: Re: Most difficult time consuming auto repair you've done?
PostPosted: Sep Wed 22, 2021 1:33 am 
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Barry H Bennett wrote:
Quote:
your gerbish is important .. lol maybe if you knew what you are talking about. You would be ahead if you took your own advice

Gerbish is .... actually gibberish, if I am interpreting what your limited vocabulary is trying to say. Gibberish is apparently something you know a great deal about, since you insist on spouting it repeatedly.

In addition, perhaps you need a spelling course, or an english course, or more appropriately, a course on how to get along with people. Go sleep it off already. I'm done with you, but please, keep showing the rest of the forum how immature you really are.

your arrogance and disrespect is what everyone knows of you.

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 Post subject: Re: Most difficult time consuming auto repair you've done?
PostPosted: Sep Wed 22, 2021 6:53 pm 
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Location: Vancouver Island, Canada
master_of_none wrote:
SparkyDan wrote:
devilsmist wrote:
Looks like a dressed up Ford
Attachment:
meteor300.jpg


DM


Beautiful blast from the past! Keeping it original is part of it's heritage, which you're a caretaker of. Great job in preserving an art form. Thanks very much for sharing. Too many great cars have been chopped/channeled and robbed of their original roots. I've gone to too many car shows where a 1947 Buick sedan (for example) now has a 454 V8, turbohydro 400, power windows, remote door latches, air conditioning, and mag wheels. It's like cutting out the Mona Lisa and gluing it on to a black velvet background with blacklight highlights . . . . :lol: :lol: But each to his own, I guess. I'm glad there are still folks who preserve stuff just for the sake of it.

Dan

I agree. It bothers me to see a classic chopped / channeled and otherwise hacked up to where it barely resembles how it originally was. Engine swaps, wheels, and things that are done just to make them more reliable etc don't bother me as much as long as they are tastefully done. Though, I can understand taking an old vehicle that was a basket case that parts are pretty much nonexistent for and customizing it to your liking. Survivors should be kept original, if possible. Just my opinion.

Right, most people want to see a restorable body saved to the original frame, or a frame built to the original specs. But after you rebuild the rusted frame and install a rebuilt engine, why not put Buick tailights on it? :D I like them tastefully customized, too. Especially the common models, no harm done to history.

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