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 Post subject: Re: Modern Radio Owners
PostPosted: Jul Sun 25, 2021 8:54 pm 
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jimbenedict wrote:
John Bartley wrote:
jimbenedict wrote:
Errr, ARF is focused on tube radios. Your Grundig and Sony are modern.


The radios he owns may be newer than some SS sets, but NO, ARF does not focus on tube radios. That may be where it started, but things have changed during the last 2-1/2 decades and the transistor forum is very busy!! Radios from the 1980's and 1990's are approaching antique age .... depending on how you view the definition of antique. Tube radios were only around for roughly 35 years before the advent of SS sets. Transistor radios have been a round now for almost twice as long and they are still being made and sold, unlike tube sets.

EDIT : just as an example ... I bought (and still have) my first antique tube radio (a 1931 [Crosley] Columbia) fifty years ago this summer. At that time the Columbia would have been barely 40 years old At that time I had already owned (and still have) a Koyo transistor set that my Gr-Uncle gave me a year earlier ... a radio that is now 50+ years old....

So, per your reply the SW radios made in the 1980s & 1990s as mentioned in this post are old vintage? And, the focus here are not tube radios even if I read 95%+ posts on tube radios.

I dunno what you're trying to prove here, but ARF has a sub forum, entitled Vintage Transistor Radio Discussions.

So yes, the emphasis is on tube driven equipment, but space is offered for solid state as well. Beyond that, crystal radios from the earliest days are also discussed.

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 Post subject: Re: Modern Radio Owners
PostPosted: Jul Sun 25, 2021 9:03 pm 
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John Bartley wrote:
jimbenedict wrote:
So, per your reply the SW radios made in the 1980s & 1990s as mentioned in this post are old vintage? And, the focus here are not tube radios even if I read 95%+ posts on tube radios.


In the early 1970's ('72 or '73) I bought a Marconi model 102 console radio from the Physics head at my high school (Mr. Laventure). It would have been built circa 1937 or '38. At the time I bought would it have been considered an antique?

John, you are more of an authority than I with a larger following.

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 Post subject: Re: Modern Radio Owners
PostPosted: Jul Sun 25, 2021 11:57 pm 
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Now this thread is starting to turn a bit crazy. :roll: :roll:
Who is following who :?: :arrow:

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 Post subject: Re: Modern Radio Owners
PostPosted: Jul Mon 26, 2021 12:13 am 
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What is considered a "modern" radio? Tube vs transistor? Digital PLL vs analog tuning? LED/LCD dial vs mechanical analog dial with pointer? Conventional design vs SDR? Where do we draw the line?

Dave


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 Post subject: Re: Modern Radio Owners
PostPosted: Jul Mon 26, 2021 3:39 am 
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Dave Doughty wrote:
What is considered a "modern" radio? Tube vs transistor? Digital PLL vs analog tuning? LED/LCD dial vs mechanical analog dial with pointer? Conventional design vs SDR? Where do we draw the line?

Dave


Right here! :D


https://youtu.be/wpmUsC5-Caw

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 Post subject: Re: Modern Radio Owners
PostPosted: Jul Mon 26, 2021 4:39 am 
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Dalton wrote:

I'd rather run my fingernails down a blackboard!

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 Post subject: Re: Modern Radio Owners
PostPosted: Jul Mon 26, 2021 1:23 pm 
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Dave Doughty wrote:
What is considered a "modern" radio? Tube vs transistor? Digital PLL vs analog tuning? LED/LCD dial vs mechanical analog dial with pointer? Conventional design vs SDR? Where do we draw the line?

Dave


Exactly....

The term "antique" has a variable definition as far as I am concerned. Furniture people may have their own definition, and it may be that they see it in terms of centuries rather than years, but other than in appearance, furniture hasn't really changed much .... ever.

Electronics changes so fast that items only a few years old could be considered antiques. In 1990 I ran an entire business with an AST Bravo 286-8 as my main computer. My network was coax with BNC connectors. Most software I load now is larger than the Connor 40MB hard drive I had in that box. I would consider that system to be an antique.

So, why wouldn't 35 year old transistor radios also be considered antiques?


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 Post subject: Re: Modern Radio Owners
PostPosted: Jul Mon 26, 2021 3:42 pm 
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John Bartley wrote:
Dave Doughty wrote:
What is considered a "modern" radio? Tube vs transistor? Digital PLL vs analog tuning? LED/LCD dial vs mechanical analog dial with pointer? Conventional design vs SDR? Where do we draw the line?

Dave


Exactly....

The term "antique" has a variable definition as far as I am concerned. Furniture people may have their own definition, and it may be that they see it in terms of centuries rather than years, but other than in appearance, furniture hasn't really changed much .... ever.

Electronics changes so fast that items only a few years old could be considered antiques. In 1990 I ran an entire business with an AST Bravo 286-8 as my main computer. My network was coax with BNC connectors. Most software I load now is larger than the Connor 40MB hard drive I had in that box. I would consider that system to be an antique.

So, why wouldn't 35 year old transistor radios also be considered antiques?


They'll become true "antiques" when there are no longer folks around who bought them brand new. 8) It's hard to imagine anything that came out during your lifetime is an antique.

Dan


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 Post subject: Re: Modern Radio Owners
PostPosted: Jul Mon 26, 2021 6:48 pm 
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SparkyDan wrote:
They'll become true "antiques" when there are no longer folks around who bought them brand new. 8) It's hard to imagine anything that came out during your lifetime is an antique.

Dan
I have a feeling that based on your definition (above), not much of what we discuss here is truly antique :)


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 Post subject: Re: Modern Radio Owners
PostPosted: Jul Mon 26, 2021 7:54 pm 
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Bit isn't this why "The Kids" think vinyl and to a lesser extent audio cassettes, are the new greatest thing? They didn't experience it the first time, so it's interesting and new to them.

I think a Grundig 700 is still useful, and collectible, but spec wise it's on par with today's portables. The onky difference is that today's radios areshifting to SDR in some form.

I remember 20 years ago people arguing about "antique radios". Maybe better to call them collectible.


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 Post subject: Re: Modern Radio Owners
PostPosted: Jul Mon 26, 2021 9:41 pm 
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Definitions for the term, "antique" abound;

of or belonging to the past; not modern.

dating from a period long ago.

any work of art, piece of furniture, decorative object, or the like, created or produced in a former period, or, according to U.S. customs laws, 100 years before date of purchase.

bygone, archaic.

old, obsolete, obsolescent.

A true antique is an item perceived as having value because of its aesthetic or historical significance, and often defined as at least 100 years old (or some other limit), although the term is often used loosely to describe any object that is old.

It is an object that represents a previous era or time period in human history. Vintage and collectible are used to describe items that are old, but do not meet the 100-year criterion.


So given the above, no AM only radio is obsolete, since the AM broadcast band still exists. Tube equipment might be considered antique, since that technology has been primarily superceded by solid state.

But a Regency TR-1, built and sold in 1954, 67 years ago as the first commercial solid state receiver, isn't really an antique, and won't be until either 2054 or when/if the AM band is removed. Of course any other Transistor set would follow.

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 Post subject: Re: Modern Radio Owners
PostPosted: Jul Tue 27, 2021 12:51 am 
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The title of the thread is modern radio owners. Would an unpowered radio using an ALD zero crossing mosfet tuner paired with an old lm386 amp be modern? Just curious.
Doug


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 Post subject: Re: Modern Radio Owners
PostPosted: Jul Tue 27, 2021 2:04 am 
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My crossover point to "modern" is digital (PLL) tuning with no mechanical tuning cap even though it might use a knob as a means to tune in stations like my Kenwood R2000 and Grundig Satellit 500 have. These radios are both over 30 years old and long out of production. Perhaps they are too old to be called "modern".

Dave


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 Post subject: Re: Modern Radio Owners
PostPosted: Jul Fri 30, 2021 2:03 pm 
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Hey All,

I guess I'll chime in.

Currently, I have a GE SR-1 (nice), a Sangean ATS - 803A and a Panasonic 840.

I use the 803 a lot, it is VERY sensitive. Digital readout and AM narrow really helps out on Dx. Ferrite rod is a bit small, so nulls could be better. No X band on ferrite though.Display hard to read from some angles.

The 840 is also superb on AM Dx (and FM) and has a long ferrite. Built in graphic equalizer helpful on some Dx issues.CD input sometimes used for VLF sferic /whistler rcvr feed. Analog scale, so mostly tuned "by ear".

SR 1 is very nice, got it as a package deal with a Select_A-Tenna . A very good performer.

Also in the stable are misc. pocket transistor radio, ie 2 two transistor reflex rigs (and also higher transistor count sets) misc transistor home brew rigs , crystal sets (is it a "modern" radio if it uses a diode ? :D ), etc etc.

Long gone goodies : Icom R-70, R-71a, IC 735, Dx 160, Halli S-120a, et al.

Outdoor antennas also long gone, making due with BIG loops, indoor wires, ferrite, etc.

(not mentioning tube rigs :!: ).

K


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 Post subject: Re: Modern Radio Owners
PostPosted: Sep Thu 16, 2021 10:09 pm 
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These are all my "modern radios" currently. One of them is 41 years old.
I sold a lot of the digital radios down through the years too.
The one I use the most is the Australian Digitech. This is a superb radio for SW and SSB. The audio is fantastic too.
The thing I dislike about the Sony's is they hard-wired the bandwidth on AM to 3 KHZ on some models. A wide/narrow filter switch would have been a better solution.
And the tuning on SW is 5KHZ steps.


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 Post subject: Re: Modern Radio Owners
PostPosted: Sep Thu 16, 2021 10:48 pm 
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carrolls wrote:
The thing I dislike about the Sony's is they hard-wired the bandwidth on AM to 3 KHZ on some models. A wide/narrow filter switch would have been a better solution.
And the tuning on SW is 5KHZ steps.

Get an ICF-2010; 5 switchable IF filters and 1Kc steps.

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 Post subject: Re: Modern Radio Owners
PostPosted: Sep Thu 16, 2021 11:02 pm 
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fifties wrote:
carrolls wrote:
The thing I dislike about the Sony's is they hard-wired the bandwidth on AM to 3 KHZ on some models. A wide/narrow filter switch would have been a better solution.
And the tuning on SW is 5KHZ steps.

Get an ICF-2010; 5 switchable IF filters and 1Kc steps.

Yes I am definitely going to get one of those. Just waiting for a good one to come up for a decent price. Ill steer clear of the SW77's. Once bitten with the capacitor issue recently.
The ones that are hard wired to 3khz are
ICF SW7600
ICF SW7600G
ICF-SW7600GR
ICF-SW100
Avoid if you don't want a headache listening to AM.


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 Post subject: Re: Modern Radio Owners
PostPosted: Sep Fri 17, 2021 12:01 am 
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I have a zillion radios, but the Sony ICF-2010 has been the only one to be able to pick up two Canadian BC stations at my location here in So Cal. By that virtue alone I have to consider it as my best AM receiver.

AFA "a good one at a decent price", their quality and features are well recognized, so be prepared to "pay through the nose". Mine cost about 400 bucks when I bought it new in 1989.

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 Post subject: Re: Modern Radio Owners
PostPosted: Sep Fri 17, 2021 3:42 am 
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carrolls wrote:
These are all my "modern radios" currently. One of them is 41 years old.
I sold a lot of the digital radios down through the years too.
The one I use the most is the Australian Digitech. This is a superb radio for SW and SSB. The audio is fantastic too.
The thing I dislike about the Sony's is they hard-wired the bandwidth on AM to 3 KHZ on some models. A wide/narrow filter switch would have been a better solution.
And the tuning on SW is 5KHZ steps.


Image



Wow, a Panasonic RF-B65. Awesome radio, from what I've read.

I have the RF-B45, which came afterwards.


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 Post subject: Re: Modern Radio Owners
PostPosted: Sep Fri 17, 2021 11:12 am 
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Renton481 wrote:
carrolls wrote:
These are all my "modern radios" currently. One of them is 41 years old.
I sold a lot of the digital radios down through the years too.
The one I use the most is the Australian Digitech. This is a superb radio for SW and SSB. The audio is fantastic too.
The thing I dislike about the Sony's is they hard-wired the bandwidth on AM to 3 KHZ on some models. A wide/narrow filter switch would have been a better solution.
And the tuning on SW is 5KHZ steps.



Wow, a Panasonic RF-B65. Awesome radio, from what I've read.

I have the RF-B45, which came afterwards.


Thanks. I love the Panasonic. Excellent on AM. I picked up a New York AM station on it recently. I am in Dublin Ireland.
Regarding the Sony's of this era, they could have been the reference radios of the era but make some big mistakes.
1: Flow soldering over the surface mount capacitors must have fried the hell out of them, drastically shortening their lifespan.
2: What's with the 3KHZ bandwidth limiting on AM? They used the CXA1376 chip in a lot of their models, with a 3KHZ low pass filter built in.


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