Forums :: NEW! Web Resources :: Features :: Photo Gallery :: Vintage Radio Shows :: Archives
Support This Site: Contributors :: Advertise


It is currently Dec Tue 07, 2021 6:14 am


All times are UTC [ DST ]





Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 44 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: There seems to be two kinds of collector: which one is y
PostPosted: Sep Wed 08, 2021 10:57 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jul Tue 15, 2008 6:13 pm
Posts: 9656
Location: Gretna, Nebraska
fifties wrote:
processhead wrote:
fifties wrote:
Before power steering came along for most cars though, I remember the steering being not too bad. When it did mass enter the market, non-equipped cars seemed to steer harder. My '60 Ford seemed to steer easier, even though it was a land yacht in size, vs our '75 stripped Granada, which was a mid-size car.


Richard, the manual steering didn't get harder over the years, you just got older and weaker. (Just like me). :D

Hey Paul, thank you for not also including lamer, LOL!



Yeah, there is that too. Thanks for reminding me.
Oh, and there is also more forgetful. :wink:

_________________
http://www.vintagerestorationservices.com
Paul
...... how hard can it be?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: There seems to be two kinds of collector: which one is y
PostPosted: Sep Wed 08, 2021 11:13 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Dec Mon 08, 2008 8:27 pm
Posts: 11713
Location: alameda,CA
I have owned my Mercury for almost 20 years. I find nothing charming about manual steering. I've gotten used to knowing it HAS to move when steering. When I first got it I would just about sweat bullets parking the thing. These days I over-inflate the front tires. I got it when I was pretty poor and stupidly sold a power steering kit that came with it. Now I'm just used to it.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: There seems to be two kinds of collector: which one is y
PostPosted: Sep Wed 08, 2021 11:25 pm 
Member

Joined: Jun Sat 09, 2007 8:14 am
Posts: 5177
Location: Melbourne, Florida
bobwilson1977 wrote:
I have owned my Mercury for almost 20 years. I find nothing charming about manual steering. I've gotten used to knowing it HAS to move when steering. When I first got it I would just about sweat bullets parking the thing. These days I over-inflate the front tires. I got it when I was pretty poor and stupidly sold a power steering kit that came with it. Now I'm just used to it.


I learned to drive with a 55 Dodge. No power steering but I don't remember steering effort being bad. Having a wagon wheel sized steering wheel helped. Normal for the day.

That car had a really stiff body, and the doors could be closed with one finger. Dad used to be really annoyed when someone who drove a Ford or Chevy would get out and slam the door like they did with their car.

RRM


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: There seems to be two kinds of collector: which one is y
PostPosted: Sep Wed 08, 2021 11:32 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Apr Thu 21, 2011 2:00 am
Posts: 5345
Location: Georgia, 30236
I guess I'm a different type of collector, also. If I see a radio I'm interested in, i first look at it's condition and complexity. I'm not one who finds restoring a basket case radio to be a satisfying project. If it's problems are mostly dirt, nicotine and incapacitated capacitors, I will get it if it's style or characteristics pique my interest. Or if it is a model I remember from my youth. The number must remain a few, as I don't have much display space.

_________________
"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."
— Arthur C. Clarke


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: There seems to be two kinds of collector: which one is y
PostPosted: Sep Thu 09, 2021 12:00 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 12189
processhead wrote:
fifties wrote:
Before power steering came along for most cars though, I remember the steering being not too bad. When it did mass enter the market, non-equipped cars seemed to steer harder. My '60 Ford seemed to steer easier, even though it was a land yacht in size, vs our '75 stripped Granada, which was a mid-size car.


Richard, the manual steering didn't get harder over the years, you just got older and weaker. (Just like me). :D

Actually it did, more modern cars have smaller steering wheel, wider tires & probably quicker steering ratio. Try steering something with a 6.70-15 tire vs a G70-14.

Since I actually drive my cars(incl highway), I've converted both my '69 Torino & Fairlane to P/S & added disc brakes to one that didn't already have option. One I've owned almost 48 years, yes back when it was a bit easier to steer, but steering was pitifully slow. In early '90s I inst the quicker steering sector P/S used, could then get around sharper corners without cranking wheel almost two full turns. Stiffness increased dramatically. Four years ago I added the P/S to system, now fun to drive.

For radios I'll leave most as orig, though am not beyond adding PP triode outputs to a AA5/6.

_________________
Tom


Last edited by 35Z5 on Sep Thu 09, 2021 12:09 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: There seems to be two kinds of collector: which one is y
PostPosted: Sep Thu 09, 2021 12:08 am 
Member

Joined: Aug Tue 02, 2011 10:47 pm
Posts: 2191
Location: New York, NY
Of A or B, I'm definitely B. But I collect largely for the aesthetics. I like stuff that's pretty, and weird. And pretty weird. Of course, beauty is in the eye of the beholder. When I first got into this umpity decades ago, I quickly found out about breadboards. Aha! I thought. Who besides me is gonna want such a strange beast? Plenty of folks, it turned out... :)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: There seems to be two kinds of collector: which one is y
PostPosted: Sep Thu 09, 2021 12:54 am 
Member

Joined: May Thu 21, 2015 4:15 am
Posts: 390
Location: Brookings, SD
Dale Saukerson wrote:
I suspect many collectors start out as type a and migrate to type b.


I agree with this. In fact, I'm transitioning now. LOL

Russ


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: There seems to be two kinds of collector: which one is y
PostPosted: Sep Thu 09, 2021 1:03 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Sep Mon 18, 2017 2:23 am
Posts: 8247
Location: Plymouth, MI
I started collecting 20s battery radios and 30s radios. Being a history buff I became more interested in early 20s battery radios. The invention of radio was a major historical event, the first form of mass communication and I found reading about it to be very interesting. I prefer to keep radios I collect original without using modern replacement parts, but I have resorted to doing it a few times when there was no other choice. Restoring them cosmetically to near mint condition and getting them working with all original or like parts is my goal. A radio with modern parts in it diminishes the radio historically, in my opinion. Most of my collection gets played from time to time. The hardest ones to use are the most interesting to me, I like the challenge. Another goal of mine is finding good homes for my radios. Today I met with another curator about a long term home for one of my radios and if it works out, it will be played, not just seen. I'm probably closer to a type B collector, although there were a lot of different 20s radios made, so I wouldn't call it a narrow interest.

_________________
Dan

Museum Curator
https://roaringtwentiesantiqueradiomuseum.com/


Last edited by atwaterkent1 on Sep Mon 13, 2021 12:54 am, edited 2 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: There seems to be two kinds of collector: which one is y
PostPosted: Sep Thu 09, 2021 1:06 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 2362
Location: Potomac, MD 20854
bobwilson1977 wrote:
...That probably makes me some sort of "Temporary" hoarder or something...


More like a foster parent. :roll:

_________________
Avery W3AVE


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: There seems to be two kinds of collector: which one is y
PostPosted: Sep Thu 09, 2021 2:25 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Mon 23, 2012 7:04 pm
Posts: 199
Location: Indianapolis, IN 46225
I'm type B. I love 1930s radios with high end chassis. The higher the tube count, the better. ARF user "AZenithnut" and I are very similar, in that accord. My interest, there, started with Scott and McMurdo Silver. It has since branched out into RCA, Philco, Arvin, and a few other high tube count, top-of-the-line sets. The problem is that all of these take up a tremendous amount of space, and I have a small house. I might be moving into a bigger house, soon, so that problem might be much less. However, moving the stuff will present its own problem. My back hurts just thinking about it.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: There seems to be two kinds of collector: which one is y
PostPosted: Sep Thu 09, 2021 3:14 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 10867
Location: Beaver Falls, PA. USA
For me, the satisfaction comes from the repair and restoration. I also like high tube count radios, and don't care how complex they are; bring on the ham and broadcast gear, B&W and color TV as well!

_________________
Tim KA3JRT


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: There seems to be two kinds of collector: which one is y
PostPosted: Sep Thu 09, 2021 4:29 am 
Member

Joined: Apr Sun 08, 2007 6:47 am
Posts: 5227
Location: British Columbia
I'm someone who is more interested in a set based on what's under the chassis, whether it has an interesting circuit, or tube lineup, or power supply, like a 32 volt radio. The first thing I do when looking at a prospect for a new radio is look in the back, or under the lid in some cases. I'm not indifferent to cabinet styling, or pretty dials, but things like those fancy Emerson "Ingraham" sets, bore me.
Regards
Arran


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: There seems to be two kinds of collector: which one is y
PostPosted: Sep Thu 09, 2021 12:54 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Aug Mon 20, 2012 12:23 pm
Posts: 1784
Location: Groveland MA
I guess I started as an A, if I thought it was a radio I probably bought it. Somewhere along the line I moved into the B category.

I collect a variety of radios from the 1920’s to the late 40’s with a handful from the 50’s. Now it is about style, functional capabilities, and uniqueness though not all rolled into one. For example I now have a BC-348 which I enjoy for SWL and listening to CW in the ham bands, certainly not unique or stylish :)

Russ

_________________
Brady (the dog) 3/10/2008 - 9/6/2021 RIP my little friend.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: There seems to be two kinds of collector: which one is y
PostPosted: Sep Thu 09, 2021 11:19 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Sep Thu 14, 2006 3:27 pm
Posts: 14746
Location: Carmel, Indiana
I'm type B, specializing in high quality radios and highly collectable radios. I limit myself to accept only radios that are as close to nice original condition as possible and I try to restore their electronics to as close to original factory performance as possible. Because of this, I basically wind up passing up about 99% of the radios I come across but despite of that, I've still managed to produce a fairly large collection. One of my specialties is collecting radios that were made in Indiana during the 20s and 30s and researching them. In a way, I see my hobby as being highly selective and well thought out hoarding. I'm just glad I'm not one of those collectors who exhibit the need to haul home every single little orphaned radio that they come across and then do absolutely nothing to them except just to store them somewhere.

_________________
Michael Feldt
www.indianaradios.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: There seems to be two kinds of collector: which one is y
PostPosted: Sep Fri 10, 2021 12:41 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Apr Wed 08, 2015 3:54 pm
Posts: 729
Location: North Providence, Rhode Island
I am yet another type, specializing wireless made in a specific location, namely Rhode Island.

Len
http://www.rhodeislandradio.org
http://newsm.org
http://www.nevec.org

_________________
Looking for anything radio related from Rhode Island, PM me! Looking for info as well as items.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: There seems to be two kinds of collector: which one is y
PostPosted: Sep Fri 10, 2021 12:54 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 3942
Location: Boston, Massachusetts
fifties wrote:
processhead wrote:
fifties wrote:
Before power steering came along for most cars though, I remember the steering being not too bad. When it did mass enter the market, non-equipped cars seemed to steer harder. My '60 Ford seemed to steer easier, even though it was a land yacht in size, vs our '75 stripped Granada, which was a mid-size car.


Richard, the manual steering didn't get harder over the years, you just got older and weaker. (Just like me). :D

Hey Paul, thank you for not also including lamer, LOL!


Manual steering is not hard to drive, just give her more gas when making a turn.

_________________
Andrew


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: There seems to be two kinds of collector: which one is y
PostPosted: Sep Fri 10, 2021 1:27 am 
Member

Joined: Nov Wed 27, 2013 5:59 am
Posts: 867
Location: Metzger Oregon
Bob, please have your brakes checked out, or take some time to work on them yourself. Wheels locking and poor stopping is not normal for drum brakes. As long as you are not racing or towing, where they would get hot, they should be self exciting and should all grip somewhat evenly. I've had wheel cylinders seep fluid, which can cause one wheel to become "sticky" and lock up before it should. I've also been told that some "long life" brake shoes are made of a harder material, and don't grip as well. They may also become glazed with age. I believe I have experienced this, I have 2 '62 Mercuries that are all but identical mechanically. The 2 door would stop great, yet the 4 door, well, let's just say my stopping distance was more than it should be. Same brakes, different performance. Brake parts are cheap, if in doubt just replace the parts with new. I've never missed power steering, aside from trying to crank the wheels with the car stopped, which I don't do for the most part anyway.

As far as radio collecting, I started in the "A" category, if it had tube and was cheap enough, I needed it. I'm now much closer to "B", where I have my more specific items that I'm after, yet I still find myself falling into the trap that is 1 is good, 3 or 4 more of the same exact model must be better. It's a vicious cycle.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: There seems to be two kinds of collector: which one is y
PostPosted: Sep Fri 10, 2021 2:07 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 09, 2020 6:46 am
Posts: 203
Location: Lexington, KY, USA
I'm all for originality to a point. But...

On any car made before 1968, 99% of cars had single-circuit brake systems. This was crazy. I wouldn't even consider driving a pre-1968 car without it being modernized to double-circuit. I read somewhere that SOME judging for some "classics" events do not consider this "upgrade" a negative mark against the car as long as some effort has been made to do it and finish it in the manner of the original parts.

In a similar vein, I wouldn't dare daily drive a US car built before 1970. That was the year steel beams were required in doors. Before then, you had a sheet of glass and two thicknesses of sheet metal between you and a moving 4000 pound car in a T-bone type accident. I knew a young kid who was driving a 1968 Camaro a lot like mine who was t-boned in the 1970's, and he limped for a year after a 20 MPH T-bone accident.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: There seems to be two kinds of collector: which one is y
PostPosted: Sep Fri 10, 2021 2:24 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 09, 2020 6:46 am
Posts: 203
Location: Lexington, KY, USA
bobwilson1977 wrote:
I have owned my Mercury for almost 20 years. I find nothing charming about manual steering. I've gotten used to knowing it HAS to move when steering. When I first got it I would just about sweat bullets parking the thing. These days I over-inflate the front tires. I got it when I was pretty poor and stupidly sold a power steering kit that came with it. Now I'm just used to it.


My 79 year old grandfather died unexpectedly; he never bought anything but "strippo" cars, not because he couldn't afford a fancy one, but because he never had a garage in the inner part of the city and it would disintegrate in 7-10 Chicago winters anyway. His last car was a 75 Maverick with manual steering and brakes. I had to drive it to our house and I could not believe how difficult it was for me, in my late 20's, to drive it. How he managed to do it at 79 was a testimony to his "keeping busy" when he retired.

Of course, I can remember when you could immediately spot a truck driver by their wildly overdeveloped arm muscles. Now, a 105 pound woman can drive a semi with ease.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: There seems to be two kinds of collector: which one is y
PostPosted: Sep Fri 10, 2021 2:40 am 
Member

Joined: Dec Sat 23, 2006 5:49 pm
Posts: 1450
Location: San Tan Valley, AZ
My Buick has single-element drum brakes and stops just fine. Every hot-rodder in our area put those finned aluminum Buick brake drums on their cars, the best thing going in their day. When you drive a classic car, you use a different mindset. I don't get in a hurry. I let people pass me and give me the finger, no problem. I don't run red lights and "drive ahead" of the car, like you are taught when you learn to drive a truck. I have driven many a mile in an old Buick on bias ply recapped tires, never worrying about it. It's true that radials are a huge improvement. Looking across that flat hood with its acres of black paint makes it all worthwhile. I like getting 10 mpg, listening to that big V-8 do its thing. This is not for everybody, thank goodness. I like cars as original as I can get them and I like orphan radios. I want stuff that most people on this forum would turn their noses up at. Cracked, busted, clock radios, orphan consoles that are painted pink are right up my alley. I enjoy getting somebody's old junk working again. I don't care what it looks like, or what it's worth. I like buying a pickup load of radios for $3 then see how many of them I can get to work.

My Buick has full power, including steering and brakes, and air conditioning. It does not have seat belts. No air bags. No collapsible steering column, no door beams. And it has a "Cruciform" frame. When the old Buick and I were both a LOT younger, I would drive it carefully and watch where I parked so some knothead would not skin it up. I still do the same thing today. About the only things I've done differently in all those years are radial tires and synthetic oil.

_________________
Always be yourself. Everybody else is already taken.


Top
 Profile  
 
Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 44 posts ]  Moderator: Alan Voorhees Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: DaleMidori and 12 guests



Search for:
Jump to:  




































Privacy Policy :: Powered by phpBB