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 Post subject: A tale of two early color TV resurrections in Australia
PostPosted: Apr Wed 08, 2020 3:39 am 
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Joined: May Sun 07, 2017 11:35 am
Posts: 916
Location: Belrose, NSW, Australia
I pass this link on in case anyone is interested.

This model TV gave TV techs a lot of grief in the early days. Smoke, flames, loud bangs!

https://vintage-radio.com.au/default.as ... 7&offset=1

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Wax, paper, bitumen, cotton, high voltages - what could possibly go wrong?


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 Post subject: Re: A tale of two early color TV resurrections in Australia
PostPosted: Apr Thu 09, 2020 2:20 am 
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Joined: Mar Tue 03, 2009 11:12 pm
Posts: 1639
Location: Hutchinson KS
Zenith used those type of module connector pins in the first generation of modular sets. Trouble makers! The broken fine tuning gear problem is familiar! And those thyristors look just like the RCA type scr sweep circuit in the all solid state early chassis. Interesting reading! Thanks for posting.


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 Post subject: Re: A tale of two early color TV resurrections in Australia
PostPosted: Apr Fri 10, 2020 1:41 am 
Member

Joined: May Sun 07, 2017 11:35 am
Posts: 916
Location: Belrose, NSW, Australia
The biggest weakness of that SCR scan design was getting capacitors that could handle the currents without bursting into flames.

HMV in the 70s had been using Japanese Shizuki caps (those lime green ones) and had a bad experience. So they turned to a local specialised capacitor manufacturer, AEE.

AEE were running 3 shifts to try to meet the demand in the early colour days so I imagine the ball got dropped occasionally. Those Miniprint caps were fine if you didn't put them across the mains or ask them to handle heavy currents, they would eventually fail spectacularly, usually years later.

Those Molex-style connectors were made locally by a company called Utilux, who usually made automotive electrical parts. Only example of wire-wrap wiring I can recall ever seeing in local production.

Just about everybody had component/material quality issues in the 70s.

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