Forums :: NEW! Web Resources :: Features :: Photo Gallery :: Vintage Radio Shows :: Archives
Support This Site: Contributors :: Advertise


It is currently Oct Thu 21, 2021 10:29 am


All times are UTC [ DST ]





Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 22 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Hoffman EasyVision
PostPosted: Aug Wed 18, 2021 6:51 am 
New Member

Joined: Aug Wed 18, 2021 6:29 am
Posts: 1
HI there. I have first hand knowledge about the Hoffman EasyVision TV sets. my father bought our first set in 1950 or thereabouts. When he brought it home, my mom and I were not pleased with the strange yellow green hue of the display. He excused himself by saying it was the only set they had in the store that we could afford. We began watching that Saturday and continued on through the next week...Beany and Cecil, Kukla Fran and Ollie and Howdy Doody.

We began what is now called binge watching, and the strangest thing happened. We no longer thought of the picture as yellpw green, it appeared natural to us. We found that we couldn't watch other sets as the harsh black and white hurt our eyes. The next weekend my aunt an uncle came to dinner and at first, they too found the yellow green distracting. But after a couple of hours, they began seeing it as a "normal" black and white picture. They left and went home. The next day, they called us and said that they were getting rid of their Stromberg Carlson and buying a Hoffman.

The yellow green so reduces the glare, its possible to watch for hours without getting a headache. And, I might add, the TV headache was one of the most common trivial illnesses amongst our clan.

I left for the service in 1953 and when I returned a few years later, the Hoffman was still the family entertainment. It didn't go into retirement until color came along.

Richard (Dick) Walker age 84 former California resident. Now living in Washington state.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Hoffman EasyVision
PostPosted: Aug Wed 18, 2021 4:20 pm 
Member

Joined: Mar Tue 03, 2009 11:12 pm
Posts: 2008
Location: Great Bend KS
I can remember as a kid you would notice the green light coming from peoples living room windows at night, yep, they had a Hoffman! Magnavox b&w tv's for a time had a brownish tint, to me anyway, that was a bit different. Of course we all remember when GE came out with the blue color tubes that were blue when turned off.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Hoffman EasyVision
PostPosted: Aug Wed 18, 2021 4:59 pm 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 1272
Location: Pasadena CA USA
As a 15 year old kid, I bought and brought home a Hoffman TV with the 10 inch screen. I agree that after watching the picture for only a short time, it seems normal black and white. I did some very minor repairs and kept used it in my bedroom until I moved out of my parents house. The set went into honorable retirement, but I still have it!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Hoffman EasyVision
PostPosted: Aug Wed 18, 2021 9:44 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Nov Thu 11, 2010 6:03 pm
Posts: 1604
Location: Pewaukee, WI
As one of the younger collectors I tend to call it (Qu)EasyVision, but don't find mine unpleasant to watch aside from it being a bit dim.

Someone once pointed out to me I set the grey scale on my color sets a bit on the greenish side and I observed they set theirs a bit on the blue/red side, and they wondered if the difference might be that I have green eyes and they don't.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Hoffman EasyVision
PostPosted: Aug Wed 18, 2021 10:28 pm 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 846
Location: Crystal Bay, NV
In the early 50's there was concern that prolonged viewing of a TV could harm your vision. Like looking at the sun too long.
Hoffman capitalized on this by tinting the screen and calling it EasyVision. Somehow better for the eyes.
It may have worked for a while (exclusive product), but eventually they gave up on it.
=====
Ron


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Hoffman EasyVision
PostPosted: Aug Wed 18, 2021 10:36 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 39264
Location: SoCal, 91387
Thx for the great remberance story, oldtvguy37! My dad brought home a small screen set, 7 or 10", around 1947-48, when KTLA channel 5 first started broadcasting in the Los Angeles area, originally on the channel 2 frequency.

I remember Howdy Doody, Time for Beany, and 1930's Flash Gordon serial segments. Man those rocket ships were the coolest!

_________________
\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\He Who Dies With The Most Radios Wins/////////////////////////


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Hoffman EasyVision
PostPosted: Aug Wed 18, 2021 11:22 pm 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 1272
Location: Pasadena CA USA
I read some place and I can not recall where, that the real reason for the tint was not due to some sort of better filter color, but because Hoffman purchased as military surplus material, the yellow-green plastic like material that was originally used to make aircraft windows. The "Easy Vision Lens" marking was just a marketing thing used in an attempt to explain why the safety glass in the Hoffman TV was the unusual color.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Hoffman EasyVision
PostPosted: Aug Wed 18, 2021 11:22 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 9999
Location: Redlands CA
I have a working 10" set with the green glass.

Attachment:
bee2.JPG
bee2.JPG [ 189.66 KiB | Viewed 2367 times ]


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Hoffman EasyVision
PostPosted: Aug Thu 19, 2021 1:19 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 846
Location: Crystal Bay, NV
Hoffman was made in Los Angeles, as was Packard Bell. That's why most of these sets are found on the West Coast.
====
Ron


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Hoffman EasyVision
PostPosted: Aug Thu 19, 2021 7:42 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 16, 2020 12:29 am
Posts: 1563
J. Hill wrote:
I read some place and I can not recall where, that the real reason for the tint was not due to some sort of better filter color, but because Hoffman purchased as military surplus material, the yellow-green plastic like material that was originally used to make aircraft windows. The "Easy Vision Lens" marking was just a marketing thing used in an attempt to explain why the safety glass in the Hoffman TV was the unusual color.


I had not known anything about these Hoffman TV's.

So the story is the sets had standard type P4 CRT phosphor, but they had a colored filter in front ? is that correct ?

If there is a colored cast on the light, the eye's retina has a type of auto white balance system, that tends to offset it over time. For example if you wear pink glasses for a while, and adjust to those and take them off, your vision will appear a little green for a while. That is likely why the longer you watch the set, the more monochrome it looks.

There is more than one type of CRT P4 phosphor though, the early pre WW2 types types had white granules, later CRT's had a fine mixture of blue & yellow granules, which gave a moonlight like effect, and some looked bluer than others. Dumont's early P4 phosphors had a brown-yellow like sepia tone compared to RCA's. I think Dumont refined their own P4 phosphor and didn't use RCA's P4 mixture.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Hoffman EasyVision
PostPosted: Aug Thu 19, 2021 2:26 pm 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 1272
Location: Pasadena CA USA
Avornvalve - Yes the CRT was standard. The "safety glass" which was not glass, but a type of plastic, has a slight tint.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Hoffman EasyVision
PostPosted: Aug Thu 19, 2021 3:42 pm 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 846
Location: Crystal Bay, NV
I have an early 10" hoffman and the "glass" sure seems like real glass. Maybe they used other materials later.
It's easy to find articles about the danger of vision strain in the popular magazines of the time.
I would call the color to be a greenish yellow.
The effect, in person, is not quite as strong as Eric's picture would indicate.
I did a post about my restoration of this set. A very good performer.
====
Ron


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Hoffman EasyVision
PostPosted: Aug Thu 19, 2021 4:05 pm 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 1272
Location: Pasadena CA USA
I have two of these, but neither is near me now. I could be wrong about it not being glass. I read about it being military surplus plastic and don't recall taking a look to mine with the idea of confirming that it is glass or plastic. Thinking about it now, glass seems more logical.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Hoffman EasyVision
PostPosted: Aug Thu 19, 2021 6:31 pm 
Member

Joined: Mar Tue 03, 2009 11:12 pm
Posts: 2008
Location: Great Bend KS
I accidentally broke a safety glass on an old philco set once and it was like automotive glass, two layers of glass with a plastic type material sandwiched between.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Hoffman EasyVision
PostPosted: Aug Thu 19, 2021 11:24 pm 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 846
Location: Crystal Bay, NV
If you look on Wikipedia under "Les Hoffman" you will find an interesting Hoffman history.
It also says that he used tinted surplus plexiglass and called it Easyvision to excuse its color.
I'm not sure if this is true, but, if so, has anybody seen a Hoffman with plexiglass?
I couldn't find anything else on the web about Hoffman's use of plexiglass.
====
Ron


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Hoffman EasyVision
PostPosted: Aug Fri 20, 2021 4:22 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 16, 2020 12:29 am
Posts: 1563
If some of the Hoffman filters were actual real glass, that would certainly be an amazing and valuable filter I would think. Plexiglass or acrylic tends to craze & crack and get glistenings in it and ultimately go opaque, so if these Hoffman filters look crystal clear, I would guess they might be actual glass.

There were once all sorts of theories about eye strain with various light sources that are now debunked. It is only high energy light, like direct view of the sun, eclipses, welding torches etc that can damage the retina thermally if focused to a small spot, and high UV, can burn the corneal surface, the cornea largely blocks UV entry into the eye. TV CRTs have nowhere near enough light energy to harm the eye (unless very high EHT and generating X-rays). Most "eye strain" symptoms occur because when we concentrate, we don't blink as often and there is more corneal drying.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Hoffman EasyVision
PostPosted: Aug Fri 20, 2021 9:22 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 9999
Location: Redlands CA
The older ones at least were laminated glass, yellow/green bonded to clear. Never seen a plastic one and I've had six or seven of them.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Hoffman EasyVision
PostPosted: Aug Sat 21, 2021 7:20 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 5414
Location: Woodinville, WA USA
In the restoration article about my Hoffman 7M112, I included a photo of the yellow-green safety glass when it was pulled for cleaning:

Image

As noted in the article (https://antiqueradio.org/Hoffman7M112Television.htm), the safety glass is a layer of plastic sandwiched between two panes of glass, like an auto windshield. You could see lighter (or clear) areas marking out a rectangle where the glass laid against the rim of the cabinet opening and it was protected from UV exposure.

At the time I wrote the article, I wasn't sure what to think about the clear areas. If the safety glass was originally tinted, why would the tint disappear from those covered bits? I'm no chemist, but I would expect any color in the glass itself to be pretty stable.

Or, perhaps the clear areas represent the original (light) tint, and the darker areas are caused by the sandwiched plastic darkening over time from UV exposure?

In any case, the CRT had normal white phosphor, as seen in this chassis photo without the safety glass in place:

Image

With everything installed (including the safety glass), the picture looked faintly tinted, if at all:

Image

I donated the set a few years ago, so I can't go back to view it again.

Overall, I found the Hoffman interesting to work on. It performed well, and it had some intriguing differences from the usual RCA or Philco sets, such as the special Rauland CRT with the mysterious "green glow" in the CRT neck to guide you when adjusting the ion trap magnet. The article has more details about that little wrinkle.

Nowadays, with the benefit of hindsight, it's clear that the Hoffman "Easy Vision" tint was a gimmick, as was the Sylvania HaloLight. Tinting the screen merely dims it a little, and putting a light immediately around the screen does nothing to reduce eyestrain.

What's needed is something like the classic TV lamp, which projects light behind the screen, creating ambient light that lessens the severe contrast between the bright screen and the dimly-lit room in which vintage TVs were normally viewed. We have a Philips TV from the early 2000s that features an "Ambi-Light" using the same principle as old-time TV lamps. It projects light from the rear of the screen into the room behind the set, using a few colored fluorescent tubes so that you can adjust the color temperature to suit different program content or room lighting conditions.

Regards,

Phil Nelson
Phil's Old Radios
https://antiqueradio.org/index.html


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Hoffman EasyVision
PostPosted: Aug Mon 23, 2021 11:51 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Apr Fri 28, 2006 12:46 pm
Posts: 1112
Location: Düsseldorf/Germany
Yes, I too own one of these beauty 12" roundies.
Hoffman comes from Hoffmann, a german name,
but I cannot find a source which goes deeper back in the family history.
Anyone here who knows more?

Thanks in advance,
SIXMILLION DOLLARMAN

_________________
From all the things I ever lost I miss my mind the most
ScottyBeamMeUpThereIsNo 4/3-TV/AM OnEarth


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Hoffman EasyVision
PostPosted: Aug Mon 23, 2021 3:52 pm 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 846
Location: Crystal Bay, NV
Here is a pretty good biography of Les Hoffman.
https://www.nytimes.com/1971/06/25/arch ... ncern.html

Quite a sizeable percentage of Americans have Germanic names. After all, English is a Germanic language, mixed with a bunch of French.
More Americans trace their ancestry to Germany than any other specific country, but the links are often very old. (e.g. a great, great grandparent)
Family names were often modified/misspelled when immigrants were processed by entry clerks.
====
Ron


Top
 Profile  
 
Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 22 posts ]  Moderators: Mr. Detrola, 7jp4-guy Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: irob2345 and 7 guests



Search for:
Jump to:  


































Privacy Policy :: Powered by phpBB