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 Post subject: Looking for an expert on vintage transistor radios
PostPosted: Sep Fri 11, 2020 7:06 pm 
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Joined: Sep Fri 11, 2020 7:03 pm
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I am trying to fix a vintage (1961) RCA-Victor 1-RJ-19 transistor radio for a family member who is very ill. I do a lot of vintage computer repairs and restorations but I have reached my limits on this since it is very time-sensitive (If it was just a project I'd set it aside and start learning more about old radios). It had pretty bad battery acid damage which I have cleaned up and the caps seem fine. It uses germanium based transistors so my tester cannot be used on them. I do get a faint hiss from the speaker but tuning and volume adjustments do nothing.

Does anyone have a suggestion who I could contact for a bit of help?
SHAREit Appvn


Last edited by benilzha3 on Sep Mon 14, 2020 8:31 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Looking for an expert on vintage transistor radios
PostPosted: Sep Fri 11, 2020 10:47 pm 
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benilzha3 wrote:
the caps seem fine.

I doubt that. Like any other 60 year old consumer radio, the Electrolytic's will all need changing, normally four. That's the first thing to do with these, and 90% of the time, the only thing, other than IF/RF alignment tweaking if you're so inclined to peak it's performance.

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 Post subject: Re: Looking for an expert on vintage transistor radios
PostPosted: Sep Fri 11, 2020 10:58 pm 
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Location: Indianapolis, IN
As Fifties stated, the electrolytics are most likely bad and should be replaced.

Also, you could post your location in case an ARF member is nearby and might be able to help...

Did the battery leakage get on the circuit board ? If so, it's possible that one or more traces could have corroded open...

Good luck !

John


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 Post subject: Re: Looking for an expert on vintage transistor radios
PostPosted: Sep Fri 11, 2020 11:02 pm 
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This may help.
Its free:
https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q ... GcdHV0-BV8

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 Post subject: Re: Looking for an expert on vintage transistor radios
PostPosted: Sep Fri 11, 2020 11:05 pm 
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Location: Mountains of Mourne. Ireland.
A schematic for 1-RJ-19 can be found in Beitman's Most-Often-Needed Volume 1962
available to download here→ https://worldradiohistory.com/Beitman-Manual.htm


For Capacitors...

Replace the Electrolytic capacitors one at a time and observe polarity. Mark their negatives on the circuit board with a Sharpie before removing.

Keep close to the original capacitance value, up or down.
Some of the old μF (microfarad) values from yesteryear are no longer commonly found - so go up or down a little if you have to.

The Voltage rating of a capacitor is how much "juice" that it can handle.
this can be increased.

Since the 1960s/1970s Electrolytic capacitors have become so much smaller in physical size and lead-spacing.
...so choose ones rated at 50V or 63V or 35V
viewtopic.php?p=3203368#p3203368


You can also quickly test/measure Resistors in-circuit (power off) for any that may be OOT (out of tolerance) - - if you see something funny, lift/unsolder one leg, and remeasure.

:) Greg.


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 Post subject: Re: Looking for an expert on vintage transistor radios
PostPosted: Sep Sat 12, 2020 5:18 pm 
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Posts: 10199
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Quote:
It uses germanium based transistors so my tester cannot be used on them


????

My little MK-328 works on any semiconductor.

http://theradioboard.com/rb/viewtopic.php?t=9440

Rich


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 Post subject: Re: Looking for an expert on vintage transistor radios
PostPosted: Sep Sun 13, 2020 2:57 am 
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Joined: Aug Sat 27, 2011 1:59 am
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Location: Kansas City area
The OP's complaint of, "I do get a faint hiss from the speaker but tuning and volume adjustments do nothing." are EXACTLY what I found on this 1964, or so, Channel Master 6515. Difference being there were 10 electrolytics in it, rather than 4. Replaced them, cleaned up the battery terminals a bit and YES it works!


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 Post subject: Re: Looking for an expert on vintage transistor radios
PostPosted: Sep Sun 13, 2020 5:33 am 
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Joined: Aug Wed 24, 2011 4:35 am
Posts: 5166
Location: Sunnyvale CA
benilzha3 wrote:
I am trying to fix a vintage (1961) RCA-Victor 1-RJ-19 transistor radio for a family member who is very ill. I do a lot of vintage computer repairs and restorations but I have reached my limits on this since it is very time-sensitive (If it was just a project I'd set it aside and start learning more about old radios). It had pretty bad battery acid damage which I have cleaned up and the caps seem fine. It uses germanium based transistors so my tester cannot be used on them. I do get a faint hiss from the speaker but tuning and volume adjustments do nothing.

Does anyone have a suggestion who I could contact for a bit of help?



You can do it yourself. As noted, probably the only thing wrong with the radio is that the electrolytic capacitors are dead. This radio appears to have 3 of them, a 60 mfd, 40 mfd ,and 10 mfd, which is a little odd, missing one of the usual coupling caps (it uses a non-polar cap). Replace with a 62 mfd, 47 mfd, and 10 mfd.

You will probably have to make your own battery, it appears to have used a 4V mercury battery (3 1.35 volt mercury cells in series) which you cannot get any more. There are equivalents using 3x1.5 volt alkalines or a memory hold-up battery. I am curious what you have in there now, actually.

If we knew were you were, you will get some volunteers, this is about 45 minutes of work with parts almost everyone has on hand.

Brett


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