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 Post subject: Faceplate Questions
PostPosted: Apr Wed 03, 2019 1:00 am 
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Joined: Mar Tue 26, 2019 11:30 pm
Posts: 27
Location: Lexington, NC
I’m in the process of restoring a “barn find” Sparton 141a radio and since allot of what I’m doing is new territory I hope a few of you can answer some of my refinishing questions for me and others who may someday be doing something similar. My first question is concerns what I guess would be called the faceplate which is shown by my photo. As you can see it was pretty roached out and I had to strip the paint off to bare metal and start again. What I’d like to know is how you would replicate the graphics and then install? The only method I could come up with is to use Microsoft Paint to make the lines and Word to make the lettering and then transferring it all to one Word document. I then printed this out on my inkjet printer onto clear decal paper, sprayed with three layers of clear acrylic paint the decal and cut out and installed them. After which I covered the decals and face plate with three more layers of clear acrylic paint. Thankfully, as you can see the clear acrylic didn’t react negatively with the base enamel paint on the face plate. I sadly was unable to replicate the graphic for the name Sparton and would really like to know if there is someway to replicate such graphic? If it was you how would you go about restoring these graphics and what programs and materials and such would you or have you used? If you use decals what is a good brand of transfer paper? I was less then pleased with the decal transfer paper I obtained off of Evil-Bay.

Image

Image


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 Post subject: Re: Faceplate Questions
PostPosted: Apr Wed 03, 2019 4:38 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 10653
Location: Baguio City, Philippines
For the logo, it needs to be scanned and then redrawn using that as a template in a program like Adobe Illustrator. If you don't have the skills, you could hire someone fairly cheaply (https://freelancer.com).

Abetter way to recreate the printing would be to do it the same may the manufacturer did, screen printing. Unfortunately that's kind of expensive to do in the US.


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 Post subject: Re: Faceplate Questions
PostPosted: Apr Thu 04, 2019 1:16 am 
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Joined: Mar Tue 26, 2019 11:30 pm
Posts: 27
Location: Lexington, NC
Thanks for the reply. I'll take a look at your link you provided and check into the adobe program though I am kind of wondering how you can "scan" something as large as this faceplate photo I posted.


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 Post subject: Re: Faceplate Questions
PostPosted: Apr Thu 04, 2019 1:22 am 
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Joined: Mar Tue 26, 2019 11:30 pm
Posts: 27
Location: Lexington, NC
Thanks for the reply. I'll take a look at your link you provided at almost $300 Adobe Illustrator is kind of out of my and most casual users reach sadly. Also I wounder how how you can go about scanning something as large as this faceplate of the photo I posted? Surely many other people here have come across the same problem here and come up with cheap effective solutions?


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 Post subject: Re: Faceplate Questions
PostPosted: Apr Thu 04, 2019 1:36 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 1920
Location: Monroe, NC 28112 USA
If you have an old copy of Photoshop, it is no big deal. For accurate work all you need is a flat bed scanner set to scan at 600 dpi. Don't worry if the face plate is really big, just scan it in sections and piece it together in the photo editor. I then up-scale the image to 1200 dpi. This makes it really easy to overlay new text and trace graphics with extreme precision. As others mentioned, this image becomes a template layer. You don't even try to retouch the scanned image. You place your new text on new layers... When you get to a graphic, you just trace over the old one... The final step is to hide the template layer and merge your new layers... Presto :D Of course your good work is never going to look like the lithographed or silk screened original... But It will look pretty good...

Robert


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 Post subject: Re: Faceplate Questions
PostPosted: Apr Thu 04, 2019 7:01 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
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Location: Baguio City, Philippines
Robert Lozier wrote:
Of course your good work is never going to look like the lithographed or silk screened original...

Depends on the skill level and attention to detail one uses. It's just line art. Inkscape is an alternative to Illustrator. There are others as well. Years ago I could have done this quite easily, but don't have the computer, program, scanner, or screen printing supplies anymore.


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 Post subject: Re: Faceplate Questions
PostPosted: Apr Thu 04, 2019 9:30 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
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Location: Nr London, England, SS1 3PT
Unless you have pretty good experience with Photoshop I would say its not as easy as made to sound. Yes! I've done it and it took patience, time and being a user for some years.

For the decal, you used acrylic lacquer which will probably be fine with the paint you used for the backplate providing that was acrylic as well (and ideally the same make). If not it may develop splits of a random pattern later. Happened to me. Looks good at first but then disappointment. Probably different shrink rates and maybe leave the base coat longer before lacquer.
Attachment:
Lacquer cracks.jpg
Lacquer cracks.jpg [ 22.82 KiB | Viewed 424 times ]


Here's one done years ago as suggested, decals are under a lot of lacquer and can barely be identified, no splits.
Attachment:
Pye white decals No cracks.jpg
Pye white decals No cracks.jpg [ 40.21 KiB | Viewed 424 times ]


Silkscreen: one colour / one screen, cost me £80 here :) . Every extra colour then add £20.

Can have half a dozen or more done for the same money though :D

Gary


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 Post subject: Re: Faceplate Questions
PostPosted: Apr Thu 04, 2019 10:09 am 
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Location: Tucson, Arizona U.S.A.
Gimp will do most of what Photoshop will do and it is free. It is still hard to use, however.

One idea which I have thought about but not tried is to print the finished graphics reversed on a laser printer using the kind of paper used to make PC boards. (I've heard but not tried that glossy magazine pages will work.) And then apply it to the faceplate in the same manner as for applying it to copper-clad board.

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Jim Mueller


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 Post subject: Re: Faceplate Questions
PostPosted: Apr Thu 04, 2019 11:30 am 
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Location: Nr London, England, SS1 3PT
If you can get a decent 6 point font then let us know :)

Gary


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 Post subject: Re: Faceplate Questions
PostPosted: Apr Sat 06, 2019 10:16 pm 
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Joined: Mar Tue 26, 2019 11:30 pm
Posts: 27
Location: Lexington, NC
Thanks everyone for the great ideas! I think I will try to download the "Inkscape" program since if I read their webpage right its free! Where as Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator are not freebies and I can't see spending hundreds unless I had more then one use for it and its making me money!

Can anyone tell me if you can spray lacquer on top of enamel or is that a no no? I found a spray that said Clear Acrylic and I can only assume its a enamel based paint since it doesn't say its lacquer. I know on wood you can use shellac under lacquer but I'm not sure what you can use on metal much less wood.


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 Post subject: Re: Faceplate Questions
PostPosted: Apr Sun 07, 2019 7:18 am 
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Location: Tucson, Arizona U.S.A.
Quote:
Can anyone tell me if you can spray lacquer on top of enamel or is that a no no? I found a spray that said Clear Acrylic and I can only assume its a enamel based paint since it doesn't say its lacquer. I know on wood you can use shellac under lacquer but I'm not sure what you can use on metal much less wood.

Take a piece of scrap metal and try it. If it's incompatible, there's a good chance that it will show up quickly, hopefully faster than you can get the text fixed.

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Jim Mueller


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 Post subject: Re: Faceplate Questions
PostPosted: Apr Sun 07, 2019 9:12 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
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Location: Nr London, England, SS1 3PT
They don't always show up quickly. Take my post above and I have had it on cabinets too. Often takes months as the paint and the lacquer dry out.

Only safe way is the same type of paint and lacquer, from the same maker, and leave a few weeks in the warm for the paint to dry out first. Even then I start the over coats with mist ones.

Sickening when you think all is fine and then you see them slowly a bit at a time appearing.

Gary


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 Post subject: Re: Faceplate Questions
PostPosted: Apr Sun 07, 2019 10:29 pm 
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Joined: Mar Tue 26, 2019 11:30 pm
Posts: 27
Location: Lexington, NC
Radio Fixer wrote:
They don't always show up quickly. Take my post above and I have had it on cabinets too. Often takes months as the paint and the lacquer dry out.

Only safe way is the same type of paint and lacquer, from the same maker, and leave a few weeks in the warm for the paint to dry out first. Even then I start the over coats with mist ones.

Sickening when you think all is fine and then you see them slowly a bit at a time appearing.

Gary


Gary,
That's exactly what I and I would think others here would like to avoid. I spent hours stripping, sanding, painting, making decals, ect. on this Sparton radio as I'm sure others have also done the same on their restoration projects. I too will too be very ill if I find out down the road the paint is not compatible. I really haven't checked into it much yet but I would think there has got to be a website with this information we all can use for a quick reference on paint and finishes compatibility's?

Dave


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 Post subject: Re: Faceplate Questions
PostPosted: Apr Mon 08, 2019 5:34 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 10653
Location: Baguio City, Philippines
Shellac is compatible with pretty much everything. Works as a primer, a sealer, and a finish coating.


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