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 Post subject: Welch Scientific VOM Demonstrator
PostPosted: May Wed 07, 2003 9:32 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 30698
Location: Pocasset, Cape Cod, MA
I've put a 150k photo in the Gallery (sideways--I knew I forgot something) of this gizmo I picked up at the last Hosstraders hamfest. The guy giving it away--it was free--said it came from a storeroom at his school which was built in the mid-60s. He said he never used it because the meter was too small to be seen by the whole class. Said he had a much larger one that worked better.<P>The original 1.5V and 45V batteries are still inside, luckily not leaking. The interior wiring is surprisingly crude: everything is wired on the back of the masonite panel, point to point. Shunt resistors are coiled resistance wire. Cabinet is heavy steel. Meter is probably a Simpson though it says Welch, and is still accurate.<P>Useless, but a nice toy.<BR><P>------------------<BR>


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 Post subject: Welch Scientific VOM Demonstrator
PostPosted: May Thu 08, 2003 6:00 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 3550
Location: Harviell MO USA 63945 (12 miles S of Poplar Bluff)
When I first started teaching at the vo-tech here in Poplar Bluff (MO), they had two old Philco trainers in the classroom from the 1960's. One was an old vacuum tube AM radio and the other was a solid state version. The tube version consisted of a massive roll-around steel cabinet with a back frame that held these big, yellow, slide-in panels, each having a functional section of the radio. Over the years, the students had picked at the thing enough that it was impossible to repair since a lot of the RF coils and transformers were ruined. I ended up junking the whole mess (both of them) just to get more room in the classroom. Worry not. I did salvage the useful parts.<P>Oh, I forgot, Doug. There was also an old Welch oscilloscope trainer that came with the classroom. I trashed that one, too, since it was a little pointless to have around. But then there was the neat optical galvanometer in the wooden cabinet that I did hang on to. Don't know if it works, but it's pretty neat!<P>Dean<P><BR>------------------<BR>


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 Post subject: Welch Scientific VOM Demonstrator
PostPosted: May Thu 08, 2003 9:02 pm 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 263
Location: Youngstown,Ohio,U.S.A.
Over the weekend, I went to a local auction at an old high school that was getting torn down.<BR>The electronics lab had a lot of neat stuff upstairs, but I couldent wait all day until they got up to the third floor.<BR>There was the largest RCA Voltohmyst classroom trainer kit that I ever seen, built on masonite about 36"x18" huge meter movement, and all of the precision resisors and parts were on the outside.<BR>There was also an AA5 radio trainer built on a big board along with a couple of trainer scopes and misc. equipment. I dont know if this type of stuff is worth much , but its neat none the less.<BR>Mark<P>------------------<BR>


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 Post subject: Welch Scientific VOM Demonstrator
PostPosted: May Sat 10, 2003 6:35 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 30698
Location: Pocasset, Cape Cod, MA
The RCA Dynamic Demonstrators seem to be quite collectible now. I didn't know they made one for the Voltohmyst. My college EE lab had a simple RCA on the wall in the early 60s. They were getting rid of old stuff but one of my classmates asked about that, as I recall, and was told they were keeping it. I'm sure it's long gone now. I was more interested in the set of six Rider manuals, which they did give me, and lots of old tubes and parts that Atwater Kent had donated in the 1930s. I also inquired about some 1880s dynamos, which they finally donated to the Franklin Institute.<P>Most of the RCA DDs were five-tube sets, but I've heard of more elaborate models from the 1930s.<P>College also had a cutaway Ford engine from the 30s, and one of my classmates tried to get that, but when asked, Ford wanted it back. Why they asked, I don't know.<P>------------------<BR>


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