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 Post subject: My New "Toy" Drill
PostPosted: Nov Wed 27, 2019 6:47 am 
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Joined: Jun Sat 09, 2007 8:14 am
Posts: 4110
Location: Florida
As I mentioned in an earlier thread, my good old HF battery drill died due to a battery (NiCd) that would no longer hold a charge. The one it used is no longer available (different connector from the present NiCd one).

I don't need a "serious" drill for hobby use so I looked for another cheapie. I found one at Wally World for $24.45. It's a "Hyper Tough" brand 3/8" with a Lithium Ion battery. The size and the way the thing is painted makes it look like a child's toy but when I tried it out using a 15/16 spade bit into a 2X4 I found that it isn't. It had no problem with that and when it hit hard spots and caught a little the thing almost twisted my wrist. It has no lack of torque.

They took some liberties with advertising by marking it "20 Volt Max" when in reality it's an 18 volt battery (20V no load).

So far so good but the big unknown is how long it will last. The HF one wasn't nearly as powerful as this one but lasted about 10-12 years.

RRM

p.s. You can get a "serious" drill for $99 at Lowes or Home Depot. The Depot has a 1/2 inch DeWalt 20 V brushless and Lowes has a 1/2 inch 24 V brushless for that price. I may get one or the other for use at my NC place since I sometimes have "real" work to do there.


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 Post subject: Re: My New "Toy" Drill
PostPosted: Nov Wed 27, 2019 8:12 am 
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Joined: Jan Tue 10, 2012 8:39 am
Posts: 1424
I have several fine drills that lack batteries. I have cobbled up power supplies to run them but my power line drills are the first choice.

I refuse to buy battery operated tools. I learned my lesson. Not only are the batteries expensive but their availabilty is short lived. I don't mind running a power cord. And I do mind running a battery down without a spare to change to.


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 Post subject: Re: My New "Toy" Drill
PostPosted: Nov Wed 27, 2019 4:35 pm 
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Joined: Mar Sat 03, 2007 12:53 am
Posts: 805
When the MAX appears in the voltage spec for rechargeable batteries it refers to the voltage reading when a battery completes its charging cycle and is just removed from the battery charger. The MAX spec was invented by Bosch sometime after it created a set of small 10.8 volt LI-ION rechargeable tools that included drills, impact drivers, saws, etc. Afterwards Milwalkee introduced similar 12 volt tools. To remain competitive with the least cost, Bosch simply relabeled the batteries, tools and chargers with the 12 volt MAX label without redesigning anything else. Afterwards, the scheme was adopted by every other manufacturer.


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 Post subject: Re: My New "Toy" Drill
PostPosted: Nov Fri 29, 2019 9:10 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 11730
Location: Fernandina Beach, FL
bob91343 wrote:
I have several fine drills that lack batteries. I have cobbled up power supplies to run them but my power line drills are the first choice.

I refuse to buy battery operated tools. I learned my lesson. Not only are the batteries expensive but their availabilty is short lived. I don't mind running a power cord. And I do mind running a battery down without a spare to change to.

I am in that same school. I have only one exception and that is a small Bosch that works well for small jobs like hanging pictures.

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Don


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 Post subject: Re: My New "Toy" Drill
PostPosted: Nov Fri 29, 2019 9:23 pm 
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Joined: Mar Sun 11, 2007 6:55 am
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Location: Mission Viejo, southern California
Don Cavey wrote:
I am in that same school. I have only one exception and that is a small Bosch that works well for small jobs like hanging pictures.
That only works if you are in places with power, or if you carry a generator. I've used DeWalt battery tools for years for work, and carry several batteries. They are very handy for tasks such as removing plywood with numerous screws used to secure a vacant building and cutting through a flooring system which is several inches thick. Generators are bulky, costly, and require fuel and oil.

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many of my radios http://s269.photobucket.com/user/FSteph ... t=3&page=1


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 Post subject: Re: My New "Toy" Drill
PostPosted: Nov Fri 29, 2019 9:57 pm 
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Joined: Dec Wed 23, 2015 3:03 am
Posts: 1119
Location: Northwest Indiana 46350
bob91343 wrote:

I refuse to buy battery operated tools. I learned my lesson. Not only are the batteries expensive but their availabilty is short lived. I don't mind running a power cord. And I do mind running a battery down without a spare to change to.


I used to be the same way, avoided battery tools at all costs. However, 5 years ago when I was building my house, I bought a Dewalt DCD980L2 https://www.dewalt.com/products/power-tools/drills/drills-and-hammer-drills/20v-max-lithium-ion-premium-3speed-drilldriver-kit-30-ah/dcd980l2 and it is one of my handiest and most used tools to this day. Comes with two batteries, one battery will last all day of work. With casual use, I swap and charge them every 1-2 months. They cost just under $200 but in my opinion, well worth the money...

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 Post subject: Re: My New "Toy" Drill
PostPosted: Nov Fri 29, 2019 11:04 pm 
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Joined: Jun Sat 15, 2019 7:43 pm
Posts: 808
If you buy good contractor grade cordless tools you will throw your corded ones away.

DM


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 Post subject: Re: My New "Toy" Drill
PostPosted: Dec Sun 01, 2019 11:45 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 11730
Location: Fernandina Beach, FL
devilsmist wrote:
If you buy good contractor grade cordless tools you will throw your corded ones away.

DM

Except I am not a contractor and don’t need to spend that amount of money.

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 Post subject: Re: My New "Toy" Drill
PostPosted: Dec Sun 01, 2019 5:31 pm 
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Joined: Jan Tue 10, 2012 8:39 am
Posts: 1424
To each his own, but I have been fussing with power tools for many decades and the chagrin felt when an old battery has quietly died can't be matched by the cost of a new one, if indeed they are still available.

One can always throw money at a situation and often that will fix it but I prefer to do things the way that suits my life style.

My tools are an extension of my body and I don't like it when they fail me. Every single battery has failed but I am still using line powered devices that were made 75 years ago.

Bob


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 Post subject: Re: My New "Toy" Drill
PostPosted: Dec Sun 01, 2019 7:22 pm 
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Joined: Feb Sat 22, 2014 1:40 am
Posts: 292
I have had Dewalt drills for years. My first two drills. I went through two sets of batteries, I'm on the third. (I had the two drills simultaneously) I sent the first batteries to MTO, for a rebuild and it was good, lasted a long time, I bought cheaper Amazon batteries for the last set and they aren't up to par.
However for my latest Dewalt, I have have two batteries about two years, and I can already see they don't hold a charge nearly as long as the old ones.
Mikek


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 Post subject: Re: My New "Toy" Drill
PostPosted: Dec Sun 01, 2019 9:09 pm 
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Joined: Mar Thu 15, 2018 2:23 pm
Posts: 391
I had a Makita 9.6V NiCd as my first battery operated drill. That was good for only light duty tasks and I swore off cordless tools until I bought a Dewalt 18V NiCd Drill and Saw kit. This served me well over 20+ years. I bought drill kits with 2 batteries everytime I needed new batteries. I got tired of this and transitioning to Li-Ion required me to buy newer tools. I decided to switch to the Milwaukee line because of their 5 year tool / 2-3 year battery warranty, and the large variety of tools that are powered by the same 12V or 18V Li-Ion batteries. Surprisingly, I was able to sell off my old 18V Dewalt tools for a nice price to offset the costs. I prefer the contractor grade tools but now there are other lower cost options available that I would recommend. Ryobi has a large set of tools available at a fraction of the Dewalt / Milwaukee costs....


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