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 Post subject: Re: Newbie - What equipment do I need to restore a radio
PostPosted: Jan Mon 25, 2021 11:46 pm 
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not nessary item.

I have this for changing jet sizes or cleaning passages.. (actually u want smooth finish for most stuff :) )

I use this quite often on diff projects.. some bits are about hair thickness. Not sure were I got this, thk K&D tool


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 Post subject: Re: Newbie - What equipment do I need to restore a radio
PostPosted: Jan Tue 26, 2021 9:36 am 
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Good heavens - the poor OP is grossly overloaded by now. The main problem with test equipment is knowing how to drive it and then knowing what the result is. You are looking at a radio with an unknown fault, but as yet you don't know what is the correct reading to be found when you put your probe onto this point here.....

You are the detective - and like all good detectives, you should know the answer before you ask the question of the suspect. When I connect the red lead of my meter to the cathode of this EZ80 and the black to the centre tap of the transformer, what do I expect to read on the meter scale and what scale should I have the meter set to? Simple basic testing doesn't require oscilloscopes, time domain reflectometers, phase angle voltmeters or any of that cr*p, the best bit of fault finding gear is a schematic diagram, the gray matter between your ears and the ability to think logically.

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 Post subject: Re: Newbie - What equipment do I need to restore a radio
PostPosted: Jan Tue 26, 2021 9:37 am 
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Doubled

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 Post subject: Re: Newbie - What equipment do I need to restore a radio
PostPosted: Sep Sun 05, 2021 1:59 am 
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Found this tool in another box and wanted show it, been looking. This was sold under the name Old Forge. It was very useful before getting old and the shakes :)
A tension spring loaded device to hold regular screw heads.


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 Post subject: Re: Newbie - What equipment do I need to restore a radio
PostPosted: Sep Sun 05, 2021 8:36 am 
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Joined: Dec Sun 25, 2016 5:53 am
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Here's a simple and inexpensive tip to consider: Start a journal.
Date each page. Whenever you do a test or change anything, record what you did, what the outcome was, or "no change". Write down what troubleshooting step or adjustment you consider doing next.
At each step of your troubleshooting, if electrical measurements are taken, record all the data.
Write down the values of any parts you change, and where in the circuit it was used.
Write down references for such things as technical publications, service manual, parts vendors, etc. that you find while searching the internet for information. Record the URL's of websites you visit when looking for information, (such as < index.php >

One thing I consider to be very important when troubleshooting is: Do not change more than one thing at a time, including not changing the control settings of the radio (or any other type of electronic device being tested), not changing settings on your test equipment, not changing more than one electronic component at a time. Make a change, note and write down the results, or no result.
Effective troubleshooting is exactly like following a flow chart. You can follow only one path at a time.

If and when you find yourself becoming overloaded and frustration starts to set in, step away from your bench and take a break. Return to the project when you fell comfortable and your mind is a bit clearer.

Keeping a journal is your mind on paper. What you record in it will remain clear much longer than what was in your head at the time.

Best wishes in your new endeavor.

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 Post subject: Re: Newbie - What equipment do I need to restore a radio
PostPosted: Sep Mon 06, 2021 11:47 pm 
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Location: SW, MI
COM-NAV-ECM wrote:
Here's a simple and inexpensive tip to consider: Start a journal.
Date each page. Whenever you do a test or change anything, record what you did, what the outcome was, or "no change". Write down what troubleshooting step or adjustment you consider doing next.
At each step of your troubleshooting, if electrical measurements are taken, record all the data.
Write down the values of any parts you change, and where in the circuit it was used.
Write down references for such things as technical publications, service manual, parts vendors, etc. that you find while searching the internet for information. Record the URL's of websites you visit when looking for information, (such as < index.php >

One thing I consider to be very important when troubleshooting is: Do not change more than one thing at a time, including not changing the control settings of the radio (or any other type of electronic device being tested), not changing settings on your test equipment, not changing more than one electronic component at a time. Make a change, note and write down the results, or no result.
Effective troubleshooting is exactly like following a flow chart. You can follow only one path at a time.

If and when you find yourself becoming overloaded and frustration starts to set in, step away from your bench and take a break. Return to the project when you fell comfortable and your mind is a bit clearer.

Keeping a journal is your mind on paper. What you record in it will remain clear much longer than what was in your head at the time.

Best wishes in your new endeavor.


The op was about hardware..

but, new to the hobby. I find myself doing this more and more like Com-nav-ecm suggested. Everything is logged, pictured many many times. I doc everything and draw trace out schematics when needed. I keep all old components. I was not so detailed when I first started off. I have found myself going back and looking at old parts, drawings, and fine tuning thing.

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 Post subject: Re: Newbie - What equipment do I need to restore a radio
PostPosted: Sep Thu 23, 2021 1:22 pm 
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Joined: Sep Wed 03, 2008 1:24 am
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Location: Boston, MA
A couple of other bits of unsolicited advice:

Not only is the journal above a great idea, but take pictures with your phone or camera before you dive in and start pulling stuff out. Trying to figure out which wire goes where from a diagram alone is no fun.

Each piece of test equipment has its own learning curve. Really knowing and understanding how each piece of test equipment relays information to you and its limitations will go a long way. Lots of books and web sites and blogs mention lists of test equipment, but really there's no hurry to get it all at once. Older, used test equipment in particular may need restoration to get it working in spec. That may become a future hobby of yours, but it's best to start out small, or you can quickly get overwhelmed (DAMHIKT).

The DMM is the fundamental tool from which all troubleshooting starts. And a decent one can be had for $50-$75 that will easily meet your needs. I'm not at all a fan of the cheapo ones from Harbor Freight; they can easily get you frustrated. You don't need a brand new top of the line Fluke, but this is one area where an incremental investment can make a big difference and provide you with a meter that will last you a lifetime (I still have my Craftsman DMM from 1988). Play with it, get familiar with its ins and outs, and remember that component measurements such as resistance are always done with the power off.

Also, don't cheap out on the wire cutters, soldering irons, screwdrivers, etc. The bottom of the line from HF is more often than not junk, unless you think breaking springs on pliers is something you should learn to live with. Again, you don't need Snap-On, but go for something a little nicer than the cheapest.


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