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 Post subject: Gluing Bakelite?
PostPosted: Jan Thu 29, 2009 12:04 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 683
Location: St. Marys / Kingsland / Kings Bay, GA
I have a small cabinet that has several cracks in it and want to know what is the best glue for bakelite? Finish and color are not as important as bonding and durability of the repair, as I will be painting the cabinet regardless.

What are some good solutions or (preferrably locally available) glues or epoxy, or is there a solvent that actually melts the bakelite back together?

Thanks,
tdkask


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Thu 29, 2009 2:05 am 
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Joined: Jan Mon 12, 2009 7:38 am
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Location: homestead, fl
theres like a million and one ways to do this and everybody seems to have something works for them. heres what works for me.

clean inside cabinet where crack is with denatured alcohol. mix devcon 2 part or similar epoxy and apply to crack on inside of cabinet. be generous with the expoxy. let it dry overnight.

next day get a bottle of fancy nailpolish. may require help from female for this. there are some nail polish brands that brag about filling imperfections, thats the one you want. clean cracked area on outside of cabinet with denatured alcohol and let dry. paint over cracks with nail polish. may require a couple of coats. let dry overnight in a warm place.

after the overnight dry take some very fine sandpaper on a block and sand down the cracks smooth. now you can finish the rest of the cab and paint it.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Thu 29, 2009 5:28 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
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Location: St. Marys / Kingsland / Kings Bay, GA
Appreciate the response. Very good gouge. I hope there will be more input on this too.

So I assume that there is a general consensus that two-part will make the bond? I want something that will hold the pieces together for a long long time. As for sealing and the sanding and painting I am great, I just need something with good bonding that dries hard.

Thanks.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Thu 29, 2009 1:45 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 8272
Location: Indianapolis, IN
I have used 2-part epoxy with good results as well.

Some folks put some fiberglass on the inside to strengthen the repair.

I did this one years ago and it has held up well:

http://www.plasticradios.com/meckrest.html

peter


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Thu 29, 2009 3:38 pm 
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Joined: Feb Thu 08, 2007 2:32 pm
Posts: 12539
Location: 06457
I agree with gluing fiberglass cloth on the inside with epoxy and fill the cracks on the outside with epoxy. Sand off the excess epoxy carefully and polish crack with rubbing compound, Dupont #7 mild or course, which ever is needed. JMO


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Thu 29, 2009 5:26 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 4127
Location: Berkley, Michigan
Has anyone had any luck using Super Glue on interior parts of a Bakelite cabinet?

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That warm tube sound can usually be overcome by turning up the treble.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Fri 30, 2009 3:19 am 
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Joined: Nov Sat 22, 2008 3:04 pm
Posts: 2641
Location: Gormley, Ont., Canada
Any epoxy repairs that I have made hold up fine IF the hidden plastic or bakelite surface is first scuffed using 120 grit. This roughening of the areas on both sides of the crack gives the apoxy something to really grab hold of. End result is a long lasting fool proof bond, especially if the area is prone to warping or needed clamping to realign the crack.
If the outside exposed surface isn't a clean crack ( chips or chunks of the plastic missing and will require some sort of paintng to refinish ) I like to dig a trench along the crack with an Xacto knife then fill the voids with just enough epoxy to level the surface. Once cured it can then be sanded smooth enough to accept a body filler of choise and totally smooth out the damaged area without fear of the crack ever showing through again. Of course a clean outside crack might best be fixed using the aforementioned nail polish method after the inside has been repaired.

My experience has shown that Super Glues tend to be hit and miss affairs. Ideally they need totally clean and well mated surfaces to acheive good results.

Bruce Webster

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Fri 30, 2009 8:34 am 
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Posts: 13371
Location: Tennessee,USA
The super glues at least for me, is what holds the set together until I can apply stronger glues, epoxies. I would not rely on super glue by itself. You need some backing to help hold the two surfaces in alignment. Otherwise you mght get cracks later on down the line.

I will use fiberglass resin on the inside, but before appying it, I roughen the surface as mentioned, I will be more agressive (on the inside) by using a grinding stone on the Dremel, just enough to pock the glossy surface.

Upon pouring the resin in, it will self-level and you won't see the grinding marks. I don't use the cloth, but you can. Or, I shred up the cloth into small pieces, then apply. Grind off the first coat somewhat level. Then apply a plain, non-cloth coat of resin, it looks good as it cures so smooth.

Another way some stengthen the inside is to cut grooves across the crack, then put steel rods in. That will act like small bridges across the crack. I only did one that way, and I don't think it was necessary.


On using Bondo products, I avoid filling too much of a space with Bondo. If you need to fill and make a missing piece larger than 1/4", fiberglass resin is best. Bondo is more of a surfacer, than a structural product. I would never recommend making a piece of missing radio with Bondo, as it will shrink and eventually will fall out of place, or develop edge cracks.
With the fiberglass, you can file easily to shape a missing part, and never have the need for Bondo.

On very flayt surfaces, you could use Bondo to help build up a 1/32" thickness., and the thnner the better. Block sand the surface level. Any other lows can be filled with primer and block sand, or use automotive "spot putty" to build a slight thickness, or fill pinholes that may be present.


Sorry for long post, if you search this section you will see many ways to so what you want. Decide what's best for you.


I know you asked about gluing existing pieces together, but I;d like you to see what fiberglass resin can do, and how easy it is to work with, and is quite strong.
(I still have this project on hold but it will get finished this Spring :)

http://antiqueradios.com/forums/viewtop ... =boomerang

Take care,

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Gary Rabbitt


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Fri 30, 2009 11:54 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 4127
Location: Berkley, Michigan
Gary,

Very nice work. Of course it helps to have 10 years experience in a bump-n-paint shop :lol:

Work like that is almost too nice to cover with paint.

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That warm tube sound can usually be overcome by turning up the treble.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Fri 30, 2009 1:01 pm 
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Joined: Nov Sat 22, 2008 3:04 pm
Posts: 2641
Location: Gormley, Ont., Canada
Sorry to drag this off topic but....Gary, will you be blending in the paint to try and match the bakelite or simply painting the entire case? Just curious cuz I buggered a perfectly good case ( don't step away from your work with the cord wrapped around your leg :roll: ) and would like to blend the repair on what is originally bare bakelite.

Bruce Webster

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Fri 30, 2009 3:36 pm 
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Joined: Feb Thu 08, 2007 2:32 pm
Posts: 12539
Location: 06457
You also can V the crack with a dremel and fill crack with toned epoxy. I have had success using dark brown boot dye mixed in epoxy. Super glue is only a temp. fix on bakelite. Super glue is good mending plastic cases.


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